Stephen Moore: 'I'm no angel,' but nomination controversy is about the economy

President Trump's Federal Reserve board nominee Stephen Moore addressed his past controversial columns Friday, apologizing and defending himself against critics of his nomination.

"Look, I'm no angel. If you go back 15, 18, 20 years as reporters are doing and look at things I have written in terms of the thousands of articles and, you know, hundreds and hundreds of media appearances I have done and speeches you will maybe be able to find things that I said that were impolitic," Moore told Fox News' "Your World with Neil Cavuto."

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"Some of the statements I made about women in a column 18 years ago. I have been very apologetic about. I wish I hadn't have written it."

Moore, a former Fox News and CNN contributor, has been under fire since he was announced as a nominee last month.

Earlier this week, Moore compared himself to then embattled Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who was accused of sexual abuse and misconduct, accusations which he denied.

CNN reported on a number of columns Moore wrote that appear to be sexist or anti-women. Moore told CNN the pieces were a "spoof" adding "I have a sense of humor."

Other reports have trickled out including ugly divorce accusations, a tax lien and videos of a speech where Moore disparaged the cities of Cleveland and Cincinnati.

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Moore told Cavuto that if he does become a liability for Republicans he would withdraw, but the former Wall Street Journal editorial board member also said the president and White House chief economist Larry Kudlow continue to support him.

"Look, Donald Trump is a fighter, you know, he doesn't back down and he doesn't want me to back down," Moore said.

Moore also made the point that he wanted the focus of his nomination to be about the economy, not his past comments or his failed marriage.

"This is about -- my belief, Neil, is we can get the 4 percent economic growth with zero inflation, high employment. You know, rising living standards. You know, I believe the economic growth and jobs are a women's issue," Moore said.

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"I'm a big advocate of that, let's make the debate about and this how we grow the economy."

Earlier this week former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain withdrew his nomination for another vacant seat on the Federal Reserve board after allegations of sexual harassment and infidelity, which previously impacted his presidential campaign in 2012, resurfaced.

Cain denied that he resigned over the allegations, claiming instead that he resigned because of job restrictions.