Lawmakers mark D-Day anniversary with Normandy parachute jump

Two military veterans who now serve in Congress joined together for a bipartisan parachute jump in Normandy on Sunday to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

“It was deeply moving,” Florida Republican Rep. Michael Waltz, a Green Beret who served in Afghanistan, said in a statement to Fox News. “It was an unforgettable experience to make the same jump so many brave men made to defend Europe and the world during World War II.”

TRUMP, OTHER LEADERS MARK D-DAY'S 75TH ANNIVERSARY IN NORMANDY, FRANCE

“Honored to have the opportunity to jump into Normandy to remember the soldiers who did the same jump 75 years ago during the Allied invasion,” said Colorado Democratic Rep. Jason Crow, an Army Ranger who served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Waltz posted video of his jump – which was intended to recreate the jumps by Allied troops in Normandy during World War II.

Waltz landed a few miles away and walked through a small French town, where he was stopped by people asking to take photos with him, a spokesman said.

“The response of the French people all over Normandy was just overwhelming,” Waltz said. “Thousands of people came out to see and celebrate the jumps. Most of them were waving American and French flags, clapping, posing for pictures and treating every American soldier like a rock star. There was such a heartfelt appreciation and gratitude for the sacrifices of our forefathers for their freedom.”

Crow tweeted that both units he served with -- the 82nd Airborne and 75th Rangers -- were part of D-Day.

“Proud to carry on their stories today,” Crow said.

Waltz and Crow were the only two U.S. lawmakers of the 1,000 people who parachuted on Sunday. Crow told the Colorado Sun that he and Waltz were hoping to “show some unity and a common bond.”

President Trump was among the American officials who traveled to Normandy last week to commemorate the anniversary of the invasion, which eventually led to the liberation of France and Allied victory over Germany during World War II.