Bill Kristol slammed for saying Giuliani ran away from Senate race against 'stronger' Clinton, ignores cancer diagnosis

Anti-Trump conservative Bill Kristol has been blasted on social media after accusing Rudy Giuliani of dropping out of the Senate race against “stronger person” Hillary Clinton in 2000 when the race it got “tough” rather than the ex-mayor's cancer diagnosis.

Kristol took to Twitter after the former mayor of New York took a swipe at Clinton for losing the 2016 election in a tweet on Monday, saying it took zero Russians for her to lose the race.

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“Rudy plays a tough guy now, on Twitter. But he didn’t have the guts to take on Hillary in 2000 for the New York Senate seat,” Kristol, who runs The Bulwark website, wrote in a tweet. “When that race got tough, @RudyGiuliani got going. As bullies do when confronted by a stronger person.”

Many social media users immediately jumped on the tweet, slamming Kristol for ignoring Giuliani’s cancer diagnosis during the race that led to his decision to end the campaign against Clinton in 2000.

“Well...he was diagnosed with prostate cancer during the race. So this is not your best work,” tweeted Nathan Wurtzel. “You do recall that he was diagnosed with prostate cancer that same year?” seconded radio personality Frank Morano.

“Billy getting rightly ratio'd for this. Of course, Bill has not been tough anywhere, ever. Not even in the rooms where he advocated for all his wars,” tweeted the Daily Caller’s Derek Hunter, referring to Kristol’s support of U.S. military interventions across the globe.

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Giuliani announced in 2000 during a press conference that the reason he was suspending his Senate campaign, as he was facing a serious competition from Clinton, due to health reasons, particularly the prostate cancer diagnosis, which he went on to beat years later.

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“I used to think the core of me was in politics, probably,” he said. “It isn't. When you feel your mortality and your humanity you realize that, that the core of you is first of all being able to take care of your health.”