UK surgeons call for ban on Brazilian butt lifts after patient deaths

Cosmetic surgeons have called for a ban on Brazilian bum lifts in the U.K.— following the death of a second British woman.

The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) asked its members to stop performing the ops until more research on the dangers of the procedure can be done.

It comes as a second British woman died after having the op, prompting warnings it's the most dangerous cosmetic procedure in the world.

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Bum lifts are one of the most popular procedures across the world, thanks to the rise in popularity of celebs like Towie star Lauren Goodger, Kim Kardashian and Kylie Jenner.

In August, mom of three Leah Cambridge died during a botched Brazilian bum lift in Turkey.

The 29-year-old from Leeds suffered three heart attacks during the 3,000 pounds ($3,900) operation.

second British woman also died this year and an inquest into the second woman's death is set to begin next year, according to the Victoria Derbyshire program.

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There has been a six-fold increase in the number of patients needing urgent follow-up care after botched overseas ops since 2013, according to new research presented at BAAPS annual scientific meeting today.

The cause — cheap surgeries and celebrities endorsing the cosmetic ops, plastic surgeons said.

The association is not a regulatory body, so cannot enforce a ban, but it has asked all members to stop performing the ops until they can be deemed safe.

All but one case deemed “major” by the NHS were for Brazilian bum lifts.

On average, patients needing urgent aftercare following botched ops stay on hospital wards for 20 days and cost the NHS 32,500 pounds ($42,500).

Complications from the procedure ranged from severe bacterial infections including hospital superbugs MRSA and pseudomonas, necrosis (tissue death), scarring, wound ruptures and abscesses.

One patient contracted the “flesh-eating” infection fasciitis, which cost the NHS 47,000 pounds ($61,500) to treat.

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