Beth Chapman’s family prepare to honor ‘Dog the Bounty Hunter’ star in Hawaii with memorial service

Beth Chapman’s family are gearing up to give the beloved matriarch a final send-off.

According to a release sent to Fox News on Friday, Cecily and Lyssa Chapman are inviting the public to join the Chapmans on Saturday for a gathering to honor the star's life in Waikiki’s Fort Derussy Beach.

DOG THE BOUNTY HUNTER: 'BETH ISN'T DEAD, SHE'S SLEEPING'

The family will participate in a Hawaiian chant and prayer, followed by a paddle out with loved ones. Those attending are being asked to bring ocean-friendly loose flowers but not leis to avoid harming ocean life.

Beth Chapman wife of Bounty Hunter Duane "Dog" Chapman kiss under an archway of roses near the waterfall at the Hilton Waikoloa Village in Waikoloa, on the Big Island of Hawaii, May 20, 2006.

Beth Chapman wife of Bounty Hunter Duane "Dog" Chapman kiss under an archway of roses near the waterfall at the Hilton Waikoloa Village in Waikoloa, on the Big Island of Hawaii, May 20, 2006. (Getty)

Duane “Dog” Chapman is also finalizing plans for a memorial service in Colorado where his wife also had a home.

“Those wishing to post photos and videos are asked to tag with #alohaoemrsdog,” shared the family. “Oe means 'you' in Hawaiian. It is customary to say, 'Aloha 'Oe' especially when saying farewell. There is a song by the same name which Hawaiians often sing at the end of a party, funerals, or when people are leaving the islands.”

Chapman died on Wednesday at age 51. Duane, 66, announced her passing on Twitter, writing, "It’s 5:32 in Hawaii, this is the time she would wake up to go hike Koko Head mountain. Only today, she hiked the stairway to heaven. We all love you, Beth. See you on the other side.”

A&E TO HONOR BETH CHAPMAN

Duane "Dog the Bounty Hunter" Chapman and wife Beth Chapman are seen at LAX on Sept. 28, 2017 in Los Angeles. 

Duane "Dog the Bounty Hunter" Chapman and wife Beth Chapman are seen at LAX on Sept. 28, 2017 in Los Angeles. 

Chapman was first diagnosed with stage 2 throat cancer in November 2017. She underwent successful surgery, but doctors months later told her the cancer had returned. Although she began chemotherapy in December 2018, Duane told Us Weekly at the time that she wanted to explore alternative therapies instead.

"Beth will not take anything the doctors want to give her. Even the doctor told me he doesn't want her to have seizures if the pain is that bad, but she won't do it," he said. "She takes over-the-counter pain meds. She will not take anything prescription."

Chapman wrote on Instagram in February that she was testing out CBD and THC-based therapies and alleged that chemotherapy was "poison."

In April 2019 she was admitted to a hospital in Hawaii with "serious breathing issues," but recovered.

Duane "Dog" Chapman Beth Chapman at the CMT Music Awards at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tenn., on June 5, 2013. (Photo by Donn Jones/Invision/AP, File)

Duane "Dog" Chapman Beth Chapman at the CMT Music Awards at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tenn., on June 5, 2013. (Photo by Donn Jones/Invision/AP, File)

BETH CHAPMAN DEAD AT 51

Then, this last weekend she was rushed again to the ER and placed in a medically induced coma. Sources told TMZ that Chapman was having trouble breathing due to her throat cancer and described the incident as a "choking emergency." Her family, including daughter Bonnie, reportedly traveled to Hawaii to be by her side.

On Monday, Duane posted a photo of Chapman’s hand in a hospital bed, noting her signature manicure was intact.

Chapman hinted in May 2019 that she had stopped chemotherapy treatments for her throat cancer, telling People, "Chemotherapy is not my bag, people. Sorry, that’s not for me. So for me, this is the ultimate test of faith. This is my ultimate lesson. And it will either be taught to me or to you. And I am fine with taking the hit for everyone else. Because I think I know another guy who did the same thing."

BETH CHAPMAN'S FINAL WORDS REVEALED

Back in 2017, Chapman told Fox News she was determined to fight her cancer successfully.

“Listen, the first week all you think about is death,” she explained at the time. “You think of how long do you have, what can you accomplish in that short time. You WebMD it, you contact Dr. Google — and all of those places are the wrong places to seek information, honestly… My husband is amazingly positive all the time. And he doesn’t utter negative words. So after the first week, my mind shifted from death to life. And how I was going to survive, how I was going to make it… I was going to need love and encouragement.”

Fox News' Jessica Sager contributed to this report.