British leadership hopeful Jeremy Hunt pleads with media to 'grow up', stop mispronouncing his name

Britain's Foreign Secretary has told the U.K. media to “grow up” and stop accidentally mispronouncing his last name after several slipped up and uttered a profanity on-air instead.

Jeremy Hunt, who is in the running for the Conservative Party's leadership, and therefore the role of Prime Minister, made the plea following a number of instances in which highly-respected journalists accidentally referred to him as “Jeremy C---" while on-air.

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BBC presenter Victoria Derbyshire was the latest to apologize earlier this week. Her colleagues at the broadcaster recently also made the same mistake. Sky News reporter Thomas Moore was another culprit.

“I’m so sorry, Jeremy Hunt. I’ve never said that before in my life. It’s normally men who say that so I really, really want to apologize,” Derbyshire said.

Britain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt launches his leadership campaign for the Conservative Party in London, Monday June 10, 2019.

Britain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt launches his leadership campaign for the Conservative Party in London, Monday June 10, 2019. (AP)

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Hunt has now addressed the foul-mouthed gaffes, telling The Daily Telegraph that broadcasters must stop, adding that he also used to be called that by his classmates back in the school days.

“I’m used to it. I had this when I was at school. Personally, I think people should just grow up and get over the fact that my last name rhymes with a rather unpleasant word,” he said.

“I’m used to it. I had this when I was at school. Personally I think people should just grow up and get over the fact that my last name rhymes with a rather unpleasant word.”

— Jeremy Hunt

Hunt stands a decent chance of becoming the next prime minister, although he may struggle to catch Boris Johnson, who is the runaway favorite after the first round of the party's leadership election on Thursday showed him well in front.

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Yet it remains unclear if he can convince more Conservative members of the Parliament to support him in the next rounds of the election because he backed the campaign to remain in the European Union in the 2016 referendum.