2020 Democrat bemoans identity politics, says it's being used to 'tear people apart'

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, said identity politics are being weaponized to purposely divide the country and called for unity, during an appearance on "The View" Monday.

Co-host Meghan McCain mentioned the moderate messaging of Gabbard's 2020 presidential campaign and cited a specific email in which she talked about reclaiming patriotism. McCain asked if Gabbard's "pro-America, pro-God, pro-gun message" would help her stand out in a field of more liberal candidates.

"It really is centered on our freedoms, who we are as Americans," she replied.

"When I wrote that email and sent it out about reclaiming our patriotism, it really was a message of a reminder to all of us in this country at a time when we are becoming increasingly divided, where identity politics are being used to kind of tear people apart for political interests, rather than remembering and recognizing what unites us."

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Gabbard cited the Constitution and said America should acknowledge its political differences, without letting things spin out of control.

"The freedoms and principles that are enshrined in our Constitution that we continue to strive to uphold, as we work towards this more perfect union -- recognizing, yes, we're going to have some differences," she said.

She also highlighted her military service and said she's worked with various soldiers of different races, religions, political parties, and creeds, in an effort to embrace the common good and make the world a better place.

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Gabbard was a member of Hawaii's Army National Guard and served two tours of duty in the Middle East

"When I was deployed, I was deployed with people from different political parties, different religions, races, ethnicities, but we stood together working as one, focused on that singular mission that we have as service members of serving our country and protecting the American people," Gabbard said.

"And it is those ideals that are at the foundation of who we are as Americans, but I think we can, and we should all agree on, and that can be the starting point for us to begin to rebuild these bridges and say, you and I may disagree on some things, but I think that our love for our country and our love for each other and for our future is the most important foundation for us to be able to unite as a country."