AOC reportedly in talks to do another documentary -- this time it's on the Green New Deal

Fresh off her Netflix debut, news surfaced that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is reportedly in talks to create another documentary about one of her most ambitious policy proposals.

Ocasio-Cortez started talking about the project with Rachel Lears, the same producer behind "Knock Down the House," which followed the freshman congresswoman during her initial run against former Rep. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y. The new film, according to Axios, would follow Ocasio-Cortez in her fight to push the Green New Deal, a highly controversial series of policies that she portrayed as a way to combat climate change.

Lears would make the film but could work with a company other than Netflix, which helped bring in $10 million when it published "Knock Down the House" on its streaming platform.

Ocasio-Cortez has already promoted the Green New Deal on film as she narrated a video detailing the Green New Deal's success from the future. In both that film and "Knock Down the House," she portrayed herself as someone pushing for bold change. That film received mixed reviews with many praising it as inspirational.

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Her participation in any new Lears documentary would seem to follow Ocasio-Cortez's general trend of repeatedly using alternative media platforms to connect with voters. Just Tuesday, she caught flak for posting an Instagram video about her experience feeling startled by her apartment's garbage disposal.  "Like what is a garbage disposal really for?" she asked.

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Any new film would come at a time when Ocasio-Cortez and other more progressive Democrats face scrutiny over proposals like Medicare for All, which sought to tackle what they saw as large-scale problems with substantial government intervention.

While many have criticized the Green New Deal as unrealistic and too expensive, the New York congresswoman has dismissed that criticism as overly skeptical. They wave this wand and they say, 'Oh, it's going to cost a bazillion dollars — like they sound like Dr. Evil, '$100 million,'" she told MSNBC in March.