'God Friended Me' stars say show has changed their views on faith, religion

"God Friended Me" stars Brandon Michael Hall and Violett Beane both shared how the Sunday night show on CBS has made them think differently about their faith. The show announced there will be a second season.

For Hall, the son of a pastor and who raised in the church, playing Miles Finer, an atheist who is "friended" by God online, has changed the way he interacts with people who believe differently than he does.

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"Growing up in the church and growing up around the church and growing in the Word, that was my that was my basis and my foundation. Right? And so to take on a role now where that was being tested, where you have to see the world in a completely different light, absolutely my views have changed – not to say that I don’t believe," Hall said at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour event Wednesday. "But I am in a spiritual place where I’m able to have a conversation with more people about spirituality, that I’m not seeing it from a closed-minded point of view, but I’m actually taking the time out to see what other people believe and how that’s gotten them to their place."

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But for Hall, just being on the show is a sign from God.

Steven Lilien, from left, Violett Beane, Brandon Micheal Hall and Bryan Wynbrandt participate in the "God Friended Me" show panel during the CBS presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

Steven Lilien, from left, Violett Beane, Brandon Micheal Hall and Bryan Wynbrandt participate in the "God Friended Me" show panel during the CBS presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

"I think it’s a divine intervention," Hall said. "I couldn’t have proclaimed this years ago, and so those are the little golden moments in my life, the stones that are getting me closer and closer to wherever I’m supposed to be."

Beane, who plays Cara on the show, is going through a very different phase compared to Hall. She is considering returning to the religion she was raised in.

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"I think it would be kind of hard to not ever think about faith and religion with a show like this," Beane told the crowd. "And, personally, I was raised Quaker, and I went to meetings every Sunday for most of my childhood. And I kind of stopped going when I left the house, but since moving to New York, I actually live reasonably close to a Quaker meeting. And I’m, like, thinking about going again, which I don’t think I ever maybe would have paid attention to until later in my life."

She was affected by the character she plays on the show.

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"I think Cara’s perspective of really caring for people and their stories and wanting to hear them has definitely impacted me when I speak to people that I don’t know," she said.