Byron York says Trump's July 4th 'Salute' exposed contrast between event, critics' predictions

President Trump exposed the contrast between pundits' negative predictions about his "Salute to America" event and how the speech played out, according to Byron York.

Fears of the militarization of Independence Day and comparisons to authoritarian leaders' shows of force fell flat, York claimed Friday on "America's Newsroom."

"Has there ever been a bigger contrast between the commentary and predictions before an event and then the event itself?" he asked.

"Before the event, we had some of the president's opponents saying that it would be a dangerous militarization of the Fourth of July. Or a dangerous politicization of the Fourth of July."

TRUMP DEFIES OMINOUS PREDICTIONS WITH NONPARTISAN JULY 4TH SALUTE TO AMERICAN SPIRIT

York, a Washington Examiner political correspondent, mentioned how a "very prominent commentator said he saw signs of another Tiananmen Square coming," in an apparent reference to a tweet from Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe.

"The resemblance to days before Tiananmen Square is chilling," Tribe wrote, reacting to the arrival of tanks in Washington.

Moreover, several local politicians offered critical commentary in the run-up to the event.

Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser, a Democrat, said on MSNBC she hoped "that we never see this spectacle of our military force being on display as a show of force to our own people."

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Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., said tanks should not be rolling in her city.

In another interview, Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va. -- who represents neighboring Alexandria -- claimed Trump "must be the most insecure man I've ever seen."

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the current 2020 Democratic presidential frontrunner, claimed Trump "is incapable of celebrating what makes America great because I don't think he gets it."

Fellow 2020 contender Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. characterized the event as "a parade for himself -- and putting tanks for himself."

In his interview on "America's Newsroom," York added after the event concluded, it was "unremarkable" in comparison to what critics expected.

"The president paid tribute to the U.S. military services, each branch of the services, and paid tribute to lots of other Americans and basically steered clear of politics," he said.