Marcia Clark says she couldn’t bring herself to watch ‘Ted Bundy Tapes,’ reveals which O.J. doc ‘got it right’

Millions of viewers have presumably hunkered down in front of their televisions to watch Netflix’s popular documentary “Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes.” However, one person who will not be tuning in is prosecutor Marcia Clark.

The lead chair in the infamous O.J. Simpson murder trial spoke with reporters at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour this month where she promoted her upcoming ABC legal drama “The Fix” and opened up about why she will never give the documentary her time.

“I couldn’t bring myself to watch it because it feels so celebratory,” Clark, 65, explained. “You know; like, ‘Wow, he’s so charming! Wow he’s so handsome!’ I don’t want to hear that s---. I don’t want to hear about it. And I don’t want to glorify this hideous monster and it feels like it might. So, I don’t want to give it my eyes.”

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Clark’s comments came a week after Netflix expressed its concern and called out viewers on social media who voiced their attraction to the serial murderer’s looks.

Marcia Clark participates in the "The Fix" panel during the ABC presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif.

Marcia Clark participates in the "The Fix" panel during the ABC presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP)

"I've seen a lot of talk about Ted Bundy’s alleged hotness and would like to gently remind everyone that there are literally THOUSANDS of hot men on the service — almost all of whom are not convicted serial murderers," Netflix tweeted from its official account last month, garnering more than 28,000 retweets and nearly 145,000 likes.

While it may seem odd, several viewers of the Netflix docuseries pointed out that Bundy's charming, clean-cut look played a major role in his killing spree. In fact, he's been described as "chameleon-like," often changing his appearance to evade capture.

Eventually, Bundy admitted to murdering more than two dozen women and was sentenced to death after being convicted of killing two Florida State University sorority members and a 12-year-old girl. He was executed in Florida at the age of 42 on Jan. 24, 1989.

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In this Sept. 29, 1995 photo, prosecutor Marcia Clark makes her closing arguments during the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial in Los Angeles, demonstrating on her own neck where a knife wound was sustained by murder victim Ronald Goldman in 1994.

In this Sept. 29, 1995 photo, prosecutor Marcia Clark makes her closing arguments during the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial in Los Angeles, demonstrating on her own neck where a knife wound was sustained by murder victim Ronald Goldman in 1994. (The Associated Press)

While speaking with reporters, the conversation naturally took a turn to Clark’s impression of the highly-touted and critically-acclaimed ESPN Films docuseries, “O.J.: Made in America.” In short, the crime author and lead prosecutor on the case said the documentary was done brilliantly – but noted that she wishes she had kept quiet just a bit while taping her interview.

“‘O.J.: Made in America’ was incredible in the way it got it right. This is the most genius piece of documentary filmmaking that I’ve ever seen, I think,” said Clark. “Ezra Edelman – talk about brilliant. Oh, my God. So, it was one of those things because he’s so good and because I knew what it was gonna be – a really important, well-done piece and I had agreed to do it.”

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Clark continued: “Little did I know it was going to be a 5-hour interview in a sweatbox. It really was a sweatbox – it was like a hundred degrees and no air conditioning, and I think something like that broke me down like a shotgun and I just said things that I didn’t mean to say. I was swearing and s---, I’m terrible,” she joked.

“I would say it should be required viewing for everyone. I would actually ask that they show this in high school. Let kids see the reality – this is what you need to see and what you need to know.”

Fox News’ Jennifer Earl contributed to this report.