Candace Cameron calls co-hosting 'The View' her 'most difficult job I've had to date'

Candace Cameron started her acting career when she was just a child but her hardest on-camera job, she says, happened later in life.

The 44-year-old reflected on her life in the public eye in a recent interview with Good Housekeeping and admitted that her time as a co-host on "The View" was her "most difficult job I've had to date."

"That was a super tough job. It helped me grow a lot, but that was the most difficult job I've had to date… you always feel like you're fighting to speak your opinion," she recalled.

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Cameron was a part of the morning show's panel of women from 2015-2016 and filled the conservative seat. She worked alongside Raven Symoné, Michelle Collins, Paula Faris, Joy Behar, and Whoopi Goldberg.

'The View' -- (L-R) Whoopi Goldberg, Candace Cameron, Joy Behar

'The View' -- (L-R) Whoopi Goldberg, Candace Cameron, Joy Behar (Lorenzo Bevilaqua/Walt Disney Television via Getty Images)

She called the job "tiring" and said she felt stressed trying to keep up with the ever-changing news cycle. She also felt aware that not everyone at the table or in the live studio audience was going to agree with her conservative point of view.

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Cameron left the job to focus on more family-centered entertainment projects. She's been married for almost 24 years to NHL star Valeri Bure and they have three children together: Natasha, 21, Lev, 20, and Maksim, 18.

"The values that my parents instilled in me included family being the most important thing. And so I always knew, even in my early 20s, that it wasn't my goal to do something that I felt kids or my own parents couldn't watch — even if a role was amazing. Because of that, I've said 'no' a lot over the years," she explained.

Candace Cameron-Bure in 'Good Housekeeping's May issue. 

Candace Cameron-Bure in 'Good Housekeeping's May issue.  (Mike Garten/Good Housekeeping)

The Hallmark movie star is actually still open to hosting a talk show but just wants it to be "a little lighter and more fun."

Cameron is thankful for the longevity in her career as "Fuller House" -- the rebooted Netflix series based off the beloved sitcom "Full House" -- comes to an end.

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"If I am forever known as D.J. Tanner and everyone's big sister, I will be thrilled and happy," she admitted. "'Full House' and 'Fuller House' have brought so much joy, comfort, and love to so many people. There's nothing more I want to be associated with than wonderful and positive things. I embrace the show as an adult just as I embraced it back when I was 10 years old."

She's grateful that working on the series then and now has been nothing but positive.

"There wasn't a big focus on image and beauty from producers, so I didn't pay that much attention to it [on set]. It was the same with my family and my agents. I never had people around me telling me that I had to look a certain way or be a certain weight, and I think that's half of the battle," Cameron said.

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And the goodbyes to her longtime castmates weren't easy, even the second time around.

"I don't think the reality has hit yet. And I don't think it will until probably the summertime that we're not coming back. I'm definitely more at ease now than I was when we finished filming," she said. "But it was rough at the end."