RELIGION

For Clinton, a daily dose of faith along with politics

  • FILE - In this Sunday, Oct. 2, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a sermon after speaking at Little Rock AME Zion church in Charlotte, N.C., fewer than two weeks after the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott touched off two nights of violent protests in the city's downtown. At a presidential forum in 2007, Clinton said, "I take my faith very seriously and very personally. And I come from a tradition that is perhaps a little too suspicious of people who wear their faith on their sleeves ... a lot of the talk about and advertising about faith doesn't come naturally to me." (Diedra Laird/Charlotte Observer via AP)

    FILE - In this Sunday, Oct. 2, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a sermon after speaking at Little Rock AME Zion church in Charlotte, N.C., fewer than two weeks after the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott touched off two nights of violent protests in the city's downtown. At a presidential forum in 2007, Clinton said, "I take my faith very seriously and very personally. And I come from a tradition that is perhaps a little too suspicious of people who wear their faith on their sleeves ... a lot of the talk about and advertising about faith doesn't come naturally to me." (Diedra Laird/Charlotte Observer via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sept. 25, 1994 file photo, President Bill Clinton, first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and their daughter, Chelsea, sing a hymn during church services at the Bethel African Methodist Church in the Harlem section of New York. Clinton is a lifelong Methodist. But the Rev. Bill Shillady _ who officiated at Chelsea Clinton's wedding, led a memorial service for Clinton’s mother, Dorothy Rodham, and gave the closing benediction at the Democratic National Convention _ feels that many people don't really know how much her faith "is a daily thing." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    FILE - In this Sept. 25, 1994 file photo, President Bill Clinton, first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and their daughter, Chelsea, sing a hymn during church services at the Bethel African Methodist Church in the Harlem section of New York. Clinton is a lifelong Methodist. But the Rev. Bill Shillady _ who officiated at Chelsea Clinton's wedding, led a memorial service for Clinton’s mother, Dorothy Rodham, and gave the closing benediction at the Democratic National Convention _ feels that many people don't really know how much her faith "is a daily thing." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks while attending the Foundry United Methodist Church for their Bicentennial Homecoming Celebration in Washington. During Bill Clinton's presidency, the Clintons worshipped and participated regularly at the Foundry. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

    FILE - In this Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks while attending the Foundry United Methodist Church for their Bicentennial Homecoming Celebration in Washington. During Bill Clinton's presidency, the Clintons worshipped and participated regularly at the Foundry. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)  (The Associated Press)

At about 5 a.m. each day — and maybe a little later on weekends — an email from the Rev. Bill Shillady arrives in Hillary Clinton's inbox.

The contents?

A reading from Scripture. A devotional commentary. A prayer. They're sometimes inspired by the headlines — focusing recently, for example, on the role of women in the Bible.

Shillady — executive director of the United Methodist City Society in New York — says he knows Clinton she reads them because she responds to him.

It's no secret that Clinton is a lifelong Methodist.

But Shillady feels that many people don't really know how much her faith "is a daily thing."

He says this is because Clinton's faith is of a personal variety, one she's not very comfortable with broadcasting.