The Latest: Ex-UK spy links senior Saudis to Khashoggi fate

The Latest on the disappearance of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist who went missing after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul earlier this month (all times local):

4:40 p.m.

A former head of Britain's MI6 overseas intelligence agency says missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was probably killed on the orders of people close to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

John Sawers, who headed MI6 between 2009 and 2014, said "all the evidence points to it being ordered and carried out" by people close to Saudi Arabia's de facto ruler.

Sawers told the BBC that "I don't think he would have done this if he hadn't thought he had license from the U.S. administration to frankly behave as he wished to do so."

Sawyers said the fate of Khashoggi — whom Turkish authorities say was killed inside Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul — was a wake-up call to the Trump administration about "just how dangerous it is to have people acting with a sense that they have impunity in their relationship with United States."

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12:40 p.m.

Turkey's foreign minister says his country has not shared any audio recordings from Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi's disappearance with U.S. officials.

The state-run Anadolu Agency also quoted the minister, Mevlut Cavusoglu, as saying that Turkey would share "with the world" the results of its investigation into Khashoggi's disappearance. Khashoggi vanished on Oct. 2 after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

Cavusoglu made the comments during a visit to Albania on Friday.

A report on Wednesday by the pro-government newspaper Yeni Safak, citing what it described as an audio recording of Khashoggi's slaying, said a Saudi team accosted the 60-year-old journalist after he entered the consulate, cutting off his fingers and later decapitating him.

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11:20 a.m.

A Turkish official says investigators are assessing the possibility whether the remains of missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi may have been taken to a forest in the outskirts of Istanbul or to another city, if and after he was killed inside the diplomatic mission earlier this month.

The official told The Associated Press on Friday that police have established that two vehicles belonging to the Saudi consulate left the building on Oct. 2 — the day Khashoggi had walked into the consulate and vanished.

The official says one vehicle went to the Belgrade Forest outside Istanbul while the other traveled to the city of Yalova. It's unclear if police had already searched these areas.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity due to the secrecy of the ongoing investigation. —Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey;