Jerusalem Post hacked on anniversary of Soleimani drone strike

The paper acknowledged being the target of hackers

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The Jerusalem Post said Monday that its website and Twitter account were targeted by "pro-Iranian hackers" who posted an ominous image of a model of the Israeli Dimona nuclear facility under a ballistic missile attack.

"We are close to you where you do not think about it," the text in the image read. The paper pointed out that the missile seems to be fired from a ring known to be found on Qassem Soleimani's hand after a Jan. 2, 2020, U.S. drone strike at Baghdad International Airport that resulted in his death.

The Jerusalem Post acknowledged being targeted by "pro-Iranian" hackers.

The Jerusalem Post acknowledged being targeted by "pro-Iranian" hackers.

The paper acknowledged being the target of hackers.

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"We are aware of the apparent hacking of our website, alongside a direct threat to Israel," the English-language newspaper wrote. "We are working to resolve the issue & thank readers for your patience and understanding."

A road sign directing towards the city of Dimona, close to the nuclear power plant in the southern Israeli Negev desert. 

A road sign directing towards the city of Dimona, close to the nuclear power plant in the southern Israeli Negev desert.  ( AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images)

The paper reported last week that Iran distributed a video that showed what an attack on the nuclear facility might look like. Citing the semi-official Fars News Agency, the paper reported that the video clip showed 16 ballistic missiles and five suicide drones taking part in the attack. The simulated attack was called "a new level of Iranian aggressive threats."

Robin Wright, a writer for the New Yorker, wrote a recent long-form article about Iran’s ability to effectively use ballistic missiles as a form of retaliation. U.S. Central Command Gen. Kenneth McKenzie told Wright that Tehran’s missiles have become a more immediate threat than its nuclear program. 

Iranian Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani attends Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's meeting with the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps in Tehran on Sept. 18, 2016. 

Iranian Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani attends Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's meeting with the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps in Tehran on Sept. 18, 2016.  ( Pool / Press Office of Iranian Supreme Leader/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

He said these missiles can "strike effectively across the breadth and depth of the Middle East."

"They could strike with accuracy, and they could strike with volume," he told the magazine.

It was revealed in May that Israel shared three cellphone numbers used by Soleimani with U.S. intelligence in the hours before U.S. drones unleashed Hellfire missiles on the Iranian general last year, Yahoo News reported.

The revelation sheds new light on the role that Israel played in the killing of Soleimani, who the State Department says was responsible for hundreds of U.S. troop deaths as the head of the Revolutionary Guard's elite Quds Force. 

Fox News' Paul Best and the Associated Press contributed to this report