Biotech eyes COVID-19 treatment trial combining experimental coronavirus drugs leronlimab, remdesivir

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Biotech CytoDyn wants to trial its potential coronavirus treatment leronlimab in combination with the antiviral remdesivir.

Leronlimab is a viral-entry inhibitor that has targeted HIV and breast cancer. The drug also has been attracting attention as a potential coronavirus treatment, particularly to quell the so-called “cytokine storm,” when COVID-19 has caused the immune system to go awry.

CytoDyn recently announced that leronlimab has delivered “strong results” in the treatment of COVID-19 patients.

EXPERIMENTAL CORONAVIRUS TREATMENT LERONLIMAB RESULTED IN 'REMARKABLE RECOVERIES,' DEVELOPER SAYS

In a statement released on Monday, CytoDyn announced that it will be submitting a protocol to the FDA for a trial comparing the effectiveness of leronlimab versus Gilead Sciences' remdesivir and in combination with remdesivir for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.

“We believe the randomized head-to-head comparison of leronlimab to remdesivir and in combination will provide answers to the lingering question regarding effective treatment options for patients suffering from COVID-19,” said Jacob Lalezari, M.D., CytoDyn’s chief science officer, in a statement.

Gilead’s remdesivir has been garnering massive attention, with the FDA recently authorizing emergency use of the drug to treat coronavirus patients after an early clinical study delivered “positive data.”

EXPERIMENTAL CORONAVIRUS TREATMENT REMDESIVIR DELIVERS 'POSITIVE DATA' IN TRIAL, SAYS DEVELOPER GILEAD

Leronlimab and remdesivir are among multiple drugs in the spotlight as the world scrambles to contain the coronavirus pandemic. Many experts, however, have warned that people should not take drugs unless a doctor prescribes them.

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As of Monday morning, more than 4.73 million coronavirus cases have been diagnosed worldwide, at least 1,486,742 of which are in the U.S., according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The disease has accounted for at least 315,496 deaths around the world, including at least 89,564 people in the U.S.

Fox News’ Louis Casiano contributed to this article.

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