Stunning Apollo 11 cornfield maze depicts Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the Moon

It’s truly a-maze-ing.

A stunning maze depicting Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin has been created in a cornfield to mark the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing.

The cornfield maze at the National Forest Adventure Farm in Burton-Upon-Trent, U.K., recreates the iconic photo of Aldrin on the lunar surface captured by Apollo 11 Mission Commander Neil Armstrong. It also features a huge depiction of the Saturn V rocket that carried NASA astronauts Aldrin, Armstrong and Michael Collins on their historic mission.

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July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing.

The maze commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. (SWNS)

The maze commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. (SWNS)

Drone footage shows the giant maze, which stretches across a 10-acre cornfield. SWNS reports that the maze features three miles of paths, bridges and viewing towers.

The seeds for the maze were sown in May. “After months of planning we’re really excited to reveal the design especially as our 16th annual maze will celebrate the achievement of those pioneering astronauts 50 years ago,” National Forest Adventure Farm Owner Tom Robinson told SWNS.

Only 12 men, all Americans, have walked on the Moon.

Buzz Aldrin, and Neil Armstrong reflected in his helmet, during the moon landing in 1969.

Buzz Aldrin, and Neil Armstrong reflected in his helmet, during the moon landing in 1969. (NASA)

The Apollo 11 maze will open on July 13. By mid-August, it is expected to reach a height of 8 feet.

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An aerial view of the maze at the National Forest Adventure Farm.

An aerial view of the maze at the National Forest Adventure Farm. (SWNS/National Forest Adventure Farm)

As part of its Apollo 11 50th anniversary celebration, the National Forest Adventure Farm also sent a stuffed animal on a balloon that traveled up 22 miles into Earth’s stratosphere. When the balloon burst, the toy cow parachuted safely back to Earth.

The Associated Press contributed to this articleFollow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers