7 New Year's resolution ideas and how to crush them

2022 New Year’s resolutions: Your cheat guide to success for common New Year goals

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The New Year is nearly here, and that means a whole list of new resolutions.

Fox News Digital rounded up a list of some of the most popular New Year’s resolutions that are sure to be big in 2022 and got a few quick tips from lifestyle experts on how you can crush them.

Here’s your cheat guide to succeeding at your resolution.

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1. Weight loss and improving health

It’s no secret that weight loss and health improvement resolutions are two of the most common New Year goals people make.

It’s no secret that weight loss and health improvement resolutions are two of the most common New Year goals people make. (iStock)

It’s no secret that weight loss and health improvement resolutions are two of the most common New Year goals people make. These two resolutions are also some of the easiest to fall off of. If you’re looking to shed pounds or be healthier overall, slow and steady wins the race.

"To achieve weight loss as a New Year's resolution, consistency and making small changes are key," said Jinan Banna, a nutrition professor at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. "For example, if you're shooting to lose weight and decide to go vegetarian to help yourself get there, you'll want to consider if this is going to be a drastic change for you. If you currently eat a lot of meat, you may want to think about setting a different short-term goal, like making a couple of meals per week vegetarian, rather than doing too much all at once."

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2. Bettering finances

Whether you’re trying to get out of debt or you’re trying to save more money in 2022, creating a long-term strategy will be your best bet.

Whether you’re trying to get out of debt or you’re trying to save more money in 2022, creating a long-term strategy will be your best bet. (iStock)

Whether you’re trying to get out of debt or you’re trying to save more money in 2022, creating a long-term strategy will be your best bet.

"The most important thing when looking at keeping your financial resolutions is to set SMART goals," said Jay Zigmont, certified financial planner and founder of Live, Learn, Plan. "SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely."

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He continued, "It isn't enough to say, ‘I want to get out of debt.’ A SMART goal would be: I'm going to pay off $12,000 of debt over the next year. The result is that you have a measurable, and realistic goal of paying off $1000 per month. You can track your progress each month and adjust as needed. It is the same if you change the goal to, ‘I want to save $12,000 this year.’"

3. Getting organized 

Tired of losing things or missing appointments? You’re not alone. Many people view the New Year as a perfect time to get organized.

Tired of losing things or missing appointments? You’re not alone. Many people view the New Year as a perfect time to get organized. (iStock)

Tired of losing things or missing appointments? You’re not alone. Many people view the New Year as a perfect time to get organized.

"Becoming organized for the New Year can be achieved of course with determination, discipline, encouragement, and consistency," said Orville Wright, a music producer and songwriter at Oh Yeah Beats. For cluttered homes or workspaces, he recommends "purging" all the items you don’t need. He also recommends New Year’s resolution-ers find support groups with accountability buddies if your self-motivation and discipline are shaky.

"Staying organized is easier said than done, but it can be achieved for your New Year when all the factors mentioned are practiced," Wright said. "Organize your will to win."

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4. Quitting alcohol

While plenty of folks will be participating in Dry January, some might feel inspired to give up alcohol on a long-term or permanent basis.

While plenty of folks will be participating in Dry January, some might feel inspired to give up alcohol on a long-term or permanent basis. (iStock)

While plenty of folks will be participating in Dry January, some might feel inspired to give up alcohol on a long-term or permanent basis. If you’re looking to quit drinking for your New Year’s resolution, you’ll need to take small steps and find alternatives.

"[First, you have to] decide to take a break from alcohol. Taking a break can really allow your body to rebalance on a massive level, remove cravings, and dramatically improve your mood," said Karolina Rzadkowolska, a life coach and founder of Euphoric Alcohol-Free.

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She also recommends substituting alcohol with journaling, self-reflection or a good old mocktail or alcohol-free beverage.

"Alcohol tricks our brain into thinking it's highly pleasurable, but there's a whole world of passions and new activities you could discover when you start exploring new ways of having fun," Rzadkowolska said. "It's perfectly okay to socialize or decompress with a drink, just change the drink. There are thousands of options these days."

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5. Maximizing productivity

Whether you want to banish procrastination, start a business or get serious about your schooling or career, increasing productivity is a top New Year’s resolution.

Whether you want to banish procrastination, start a business or get serious about your schooling or career, increasing productivity is a top New Year’s resolution. (iStock)

Whether you want to banish procrastination, start a business or get serious about your schooling or career, increasing productivity is a top New Year’s resolution. Life coach Ella Destiny says people often maximize their productivity when they know what their purpose is.  

"A lot of times we get caught up in doing stuff just because we think it's what we're supposed to be doing or what we have to do," Destiny said. "It's not purpose-driven, our thoughts or hearts and minds aren't into it, and it leaves us counterproductive, [so] we do it haphazardly and don't give it our all. That's because it's not in alignment with our assignment or purpose, and so it just becomes another ‘thing’ we need to do."

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She continued, "Eliminate what's not for you, get it off your plate and focus on what is, and you'll find yourself to be much better at productivity because it's actually something you want to do or like doing."

6. Minimizing waste and living more sustainably

If your New Year’s resolution involves you being kinder to the earth, your goal might be to reduce waste or live a more sustainable life.

If your New Year’s resolution involves you being kinder to the earth, your goal might be to reduce waste or live a more sustainable life. (iStock)

If your New Year’s resolution involves you being kinder to the earth, Dr. Erica Dodds – the Chief Operating Officer at the Foundation for Climate Restoration has a few tips that’ll help you achieve your goal.

Dodds recommends unplugging big appliances when the electrical grid is "stressed" (e.g. weeknights from 7 to 8 p.m.), refilling empty bottles and containers from eco-friendly manufacturers and retailers, shopping secondhand, donating or volunteering at climate nonprofits, using produce before it expires and investing in a carbon footprint reduction subscription service like Climeworks, which reportedly reduces 1 kilogram of carbon dioxide from the air for every dollar spent. 

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"Envision the planet that you want to see in 2022," said Dodds. "Ask not what your planet can do for you, but what you can do for your planet. Align your actions with the outcome you want to see, and take heart in the fact that your actions make a difference. The more you can do to make the planet livable, the less eco-anxiety you're likely to have."

7. Practicing more self-care

There’s no denying that the COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful. So, it’s not surprising that people are looking to practice more self-care.

There’s no denying that the COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful. So, it’s not surprising that people are looking to practice more self-care. (iStock)

There’s no denying that the COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful. So, it’s not surprising that people are looking to practice more self-care to ensure their physical and mental health remains strong.

"Winter months can be especially tough," said Rachael Babiracki, the head trainer at Les Mills US – a fitness training program. That’s why getting five to 10 minutes of sunshine per day is the first self-care recommendation Babiracki thinks New Year’s resolutioners should make all year-round.

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The other self-care tips Babiracki recommends include regular meditation and socialization, exercising more with "joyful movement" (e.g. walking, yoga, stretches and dance) and practicing gratitude.

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