Couple responds to backlash for crowdfunding their wedding: 'We're not money grabbing people'

Two lovebirds in the U.K. refuse to let toxic social media comments diminish their excitement about their April wedding day, as the betrothed pair have caught heat and gone viral in recent days for crowdfunding for their upcoming nuptials.

Despite a year of saving after their January 2017 engagement, Natalie Borg and Richard McMurray realized last month that their budget would fall $5,800 short ahead of their April 27 wedding, News.com.au reports.

To compensate, the pair turned to crowdfunding — though they didn’t expect their pitch to take such a dramatic turn for the worse.

Despite a year of saving after their January 2017 engagement, Natalie Borg and Richard McMurray realized last month that their budget would fall $5,800 short ahead of their April 27 wedding.

Despite a year of saving after their January 2017 engagement, Natalie Borg and Richard McMurray realized last month that their budget would fall $5,800 short ahead of their April 27 wedding. (Natalie Borg/GoFundMe)

“Despite throwing all our wages at the wedding costs, selling our belongings and taking as many extra shifts at work as are available we are still falling short of our final bills,” Borg wrote on a GoFundMe page for the cause on Jan. 18. “As we can’t put off the wedding for another few months — (everything is booked) we are asking in lieu of any wedding gifts if you are able to please contribute anything to our costs for the day that would be amazing.

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“Final payments we are still trying to cover are mainly for the venue, photographer, cake and dress alterations. We have no honeymoon budget and not worrying about this just want to be able to cover our bills for the day so it can go ahead.”

Though the future bride and groom have raised $1,477 of a $5,835 goal in 21 days, thanks to the generosity of 52 donors, their plea has since been publicized by local media and sparked fierce criticism from online commenters, as per the Edinburgh Evening News.

“What happened to having a sense of pride? Omg!” one critic clapped.

“What happened to having a sense of pride? Omg!” one critic clapped. (iStock)

“What happened to having a sense of pride? Omg!” one critic clapped.

“Pretty cheeky to set up a fundraising page for that,” another agreed.

“Just get married at registry. Then have a few drinks in the house,” one pragmatic commenter suggested.

“Save enough for your marriage license that’s all you need,” another chimed in.

Nevertheless, Borg insists she and her beau of two years are not “money grabbing people” and turned to the crowd funding platform as a last resort to make their dream wedding a reality,

Nevertheless, Borg insists she and her beau of two years are not “money grabbing people” and turned to the crowd funding platform as a last resort to make their dream wedding a reality, (iStock)

Nevertheless, Borg insists she and her beau of two years are not “money grabbing people” and turned to the crowdfunding platform as a last resort to make their dream wedding a reality, according to The Daily Mirror. Borg divulged that the couple made every effort to save up for the big day, such as taking on extra shifts at work and selling some of their belongings.

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"I think if people had done a media campaign to pay for their wedding I would think that's pretty cheeky, but if it's to pay for the day instead of presents, it's fine,” the bride-to-be said, as per the Mirror. “We don't have a honeymoon booked, we've just booked two weeks off and will chill out and go out walks to the beach.”

“We're not money grabbing people, we're people that have worked really hard for our big day. We've paid for the majority of our wedding but we just need a bit extra to help us get there,” she added.

Nevertheless, the backlash has been so severe, that the couple was incited to voice their grievances and share more information on their side of the story with an updated message on their GoFundMe page.

“Our Go Fund Me page was shared with close friends and family as an ‘option’ to send us some cash towards costs rather than buying wedding presents we don’t need. We are not asking people to pay for our wedding — we have paid for two thirds of it (and counting) over the last year through honest hard work,” the pair wrote online on Feb. 6.

“Our Go Fund Me page was shared with close friends and family as an ‘option’ to send us some cash towards costs rather than buying wedding presents we don’t need. We are not asking people to pay for our wedding — we have paid for two thirds of it (and counting) over the last year through honest hard work,” the pair wrote online on Feb. 6. (iStock)

“Our Go Fund Me page was shared with close friends and family as an ‘option’ to send us some cash towards costs rather than buying wedding presents we don’t need. We are not asking people to pay for our wedding — we have paid for two thirds of it (and counting) over the last year through honest hard work,” the pair wrote online on Feb. 6.

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“Our post was never aimed at the wider general public and the platform was an easy way for us to receive funds from our close social circle. We assumed we might get a few hundred quid paid in from friends and family,” they continued. “Everyone has different opinions and wants for their wedding and we just planned ours how we wanted it.”

Moving forward, here’s hoping that Borg and her groom can ultimately find their happily ever after — one way or another.

Meanwhile, their now-viral story wouldn’t be the first time that a couple has made headlines for seeking financial aid from strangers and friends on their road to the altar.

In August, a bride canceled her wedding and broke up with her fiancé after friends and family refuse to pay for their $60,000 nuptials.

Likewise, in October, one bride-to-be got slammed for sending along a full-page “essay of rules” with her wedding invitations, requesting that guests pay for their own food and booze at the nuptials, wear certain colors, and consider donating to a GoFundMe page for the honeymoon in lieu of gifts.

Just a few days ago, one bold bride caught heat for asking guests for $233 a pop to “secure” their place at her nuptials.

Fox News’ Michelle Gant and Alexandra Deabler contributed to this report.