US

Community policing is centerpiece of reform agreement between Cleveland, Justice Department

  • Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson speaks at a news conference announcing the settlement agreement with the City of Cleveland, Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Cleveland. Cleveland agreed to overhaul its police department under the supervision of a federal monitor in a settlement announced Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Justice over a pattern of excessive force and other abuses by officers. The announcement comes three days after a white patrolman was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter charges in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire following a high-speed chase. The case helped prompt an 18-month investigation by the Justice Department. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson speaks at a news conference announcing the settlement agreement with the City of Cleveland, Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Cleveland. Cleveland agreed to overhaul its police department under the supervision of a federal monitor in a settlement announced Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Justice over a pattern of excessive force and other abuses by officers. The announcement comes three days after a white patrolman was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter charges in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire following a high-speed chase. The case helped prompt an 18-month investigation by the Justice Department. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)  (The Associated Press)

  • Vanita Gupta, head of civil rights division at the Department of Justice speaks at a news conference announcing the settlement agreement with the City of Cleveland Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Cleveland. Cleveland agreed to overhaul its police department under the supervision of a federal monitor in a settlement announced Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Justice over a pattern of excessive force and other abuses by officers. The announcement comes three days after a white patrolman was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter charges in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire following a high-speed chase. The case helped prompt an 18-month investigation by the Justice Department. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    Vanita Gupta, head of civil rights division at the Department of Justice speaks at a news conference announcing the settlement agreement with the City of Cleveland Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Cleveland. Cleveland agreed to overhaul its police department under the supervision of a federal monitor in a settlement announced Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Justice over a pattern of excessive force and other abuses by officers. The announcement comes three days after a white patrolman was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter charges in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire following a high-speed chase. The case helped prompt an 18-month investigation by the Justice Department. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. Attorney Steven Dettelbach, center,  holds up the settlement agreement with the City of Cleveland as he speaks at a news conference Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Cleveland. Cleveland agreed to overhaul its police department under the supervision of a federal monitor in a settlement announced Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Justice over a pattern of excessive force and other abuses by officers. The announcement comes three days after a white patrolman was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter charges in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire following a high-speed chase. The case helped prompt an 18-month investigation by the Justice Department. Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, left, and Vanita Gupta, head of civil rights division at the Department of Justice, right, listen. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    U.S. Attorney Steven Dettelbach, center, holds up the settlement agreement with the City of Cleveland as he speaks at a news conference Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Cleveland. Cleveland agreed to overhaul its police department under the supervision of a federal monitor in a settlement announced Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Justice over a pattern of excessive force and other abuses by officers. The announcement comes three days after a white patrolman was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter charges in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire following a high-speed chase. The case helped prompt an 18-month investigation by the Justice Department. Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, left, and Vanita Gupta, head of civil rights division at the Department of Justice, right, listen. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)  (The Associated Press)

Community policing is one of the key elements in an agreement between Cleveland and the U.S. Department of Justice on how the city's troubled police department will be reformed.

The settlement calls for the creation of a community policing commission consisting of 10 city residents and three police union officials to make recommendations about policies and practices aimed at making policing in Cleveland free of bias and more transparent.

The 105-page agreement was filed in federal court on Tuesday. A judge must approve the settlement and an independent monitor will be appointed to oversee reforms.