Dominic Green: Prince Andrew allegations could be 'biggest royal scandal since Edward VIII palled around with Nazis'

The friendship between Prince Andrew and the late convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein could set off a royal scandal of a magnitude not seen since World War II, according to British columnist and editor Dominic Green.

Green, the life and arts editor for Spectator USA, told "The Story" on Thursday that Andrew's widely-criticized BBC interview about his relationship with Epstein and the Duke of York being "essentially fired" from royal duties by his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, could spell trouble for the 59-year-old.

When asked about reports that Prince Charles had lobbied the Queen to move his younger brother out of the limelight, Green said: "I can absolutely believe that."

PRINCE ANDREW TO 'STEP BACK' FROM PUBLIC DUTIES OVER JEFFREY EPSTEIN FRIENDSHIP

Green said the FBI wants to speak with Andrew as a witness in its ongoing investigations against Epstein, and that the royal has been "completely unable to exculpate himself."

"This has the makings of the biggest royal scandal since Edward VIII palled around with the Nazis," he said.

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Green added it is possible that Andrew could try and hold another interview with the media in hopes of negating the blowback from the first interview.

The writer remarked that Andrew has largely been a "spare part" in the British royal apparatus for many years and that his day-to-day activities have gone under the radar compared to that of his mother, elder brother Charles and nephews William and Harry.

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Edward VIII ascended to the throne in January 1936 following the death of his father, George V. However, he served less than a year in that role choosing to abdicate in order to marry twice-divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson. His younger brother, George VI, became king -- and was succeeded by daughter Queen Elizabeth II.

Months after Edward's abdication, he and Simpson went on a tour of Germany, where they met Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler and were photographed giving Nazi salutes.

“They became very close to Hitler,” British journalist Andrew Morton previously told Fox News. “[Edward] sympathized with Hitler. And even after the war, even after all the horrors of the concentration camps, he said to people at dinner parties, ‘Hitler wasn’t such a bad chap.’"

Fox News' Stephanie Nolasco contributed to this report.