Medical student who implied she stuck patient twice for mocking pronoun pin no longer working with patients

A Wake Forest School of Medicine spokeswoman said the student is no longer involved in patient care

 A North Carolina medical student is no longer working directly with patients after she suggested on Twitter that she intentionally stuck a patient twice with a needle for mocking her pronoun pin.

"The student is not involved in patient care activities at this time," Wake Forest School of Medicine spokeswoman Paula Faria told "Tucker Carlson Tonight" producer Gregg Re, according to his Twitter feed.

ETHICS PROFESSOR SLAMS MEDICAL STUDENT WHO IMPLIED SHE STUCK A PATIENT FOR MOCKING HER PRONOUN PIN

The fourth-year medical student, Kychelle Del Rosario, came under fire after complaining in a tweet about a patient's response to her she/her pronoun pin.

"I had a patient I was doing a blood draw on see my pronoun pin and loudly laugh to the staff 'She/Her? Well of course it is! What other pronouns even are there? It?" Del Rosario wrote on her since shuttered account. "I missed his vein so he had to get stuck twice."

The Twitter account Libs of Tik Tok shared a screenshot of the comment with the account's 578,000 followers, eliciting shocked reactions.

WAKE FOREST MEDICAL STUDENT SUGGESTS SHE STUCK PATIENT TWICE WITH NEEDLE AFTER SHE CALLED OUT HER PRONOUN PIN

Faria said in a statement Thursday that the university does not condone the student's conduct.

"The actions described in this student’s social media post do not in any way reflect the quality of care and compassion that Wake Forest University School of Medicine strives to provide to our patients each and every day," she told Fox News in a statement. "We stand behind our values that include trust, excellence and a space where all belong, and we actively reinforce those values with learners and providers."

 Another medical student, Ewen Liu, came to Del Rosario's defense on social media. 

"Heard this story firsthand weeks ago and seems like ppl are misinterpreting (understandably from the phrasing)." she wrote. "To clarify, the missed stick was COMPLETELY an accident and just seemed ‘karm-tic’. She is kind and professional and would never harm anyone intentionally."

Wake Forest University campus at Winston-Salem. 

Wake Forest University campus at Winston-Salem.  (Photo by John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images)

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After intense backlash for the "karma" explanation, Liu appears to have deleted her Twitter account.

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Professor Cheryl Erwin, director of Texas Tech University's Center for Ethics, Humanities and Spirituality, slammed Del Rosario's conduct, calling it a "lapse in judgement" that warrants discipline.