Marianne Williamson shares edited photo of herself with women running for president

Marianne Williamson may be considered a long shot for the White House but she is not cool with being overlooked.

The self-help author and spiritual guru was excluded from a recent Vogue magazine photo shoot and feature story about the female candidates running for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. The photo features Sens. Kamala Harris, Calif., Elizabeth Warren, Mass., Amy Klobuchar, Minn., Kirsten Gillibrand, N.Y., and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard giving each other high fives.

Williamson, the sixth hopeful, took matters in her own hands Thursday and shared on Instagram an edited version of the photo used in the Vogue story with her portrait in the background.

"The campaign didn't create the meme," a Williamson campaign spokesperson told Fox News in an email. "All credit goes to the people of the internet who never fail to deliver."

Marianne Williamson edited a portrait of herself into a photo used by Vogue for a feature on five women vying for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. Williams was excluded from the story. 

Marianne Williamson edited a portrait of herself into a photo used by Vogue for a feature on five women vying for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. Williams was excluded from the story.  (Marianne Williamson / Instagram)

The feature, titled "Madam President? Five Candidates on What It Will Take to Shatter the Most Stubborn Glass Ceiling," mentions Williamson but doesn't appear to indicate she was interviewed. The spread characterized the story as female lawmakers running for president.

Williamson's supporters criticized Vogue, with many taking to Twitter to voice their displeasure.

LONG-SHOT 2020 DEM MARIANNE WILLIAMSON CALLS FOR REPARATIONS, AFTER DEBATE SKIRMISH OVER SOUTH BEND SHOOTING

A Vogue spokesperson did not immediately respond to a Fox News request for comment Friday. Williamson addressed the controversy Wednesday in a lengthy Instagram post.

Five female lawmakers shown in a Vogue photo shoot giving each other high fives. 

Five female lawmakers shown in a Vogue photo shoot giving each other high fives.  (Marianne Williamson / Instagram)

"You might have noticed who’s not in this picture,” she wrote. “And let’s be clear why it matters: the issue is ethical responsibility on the part of the media. The framers of the Constitution did not make Vogue magazine the gate keepers of America’s political process, here to determine who and who is not to be considered a serious political candidate.”

"The framers themselves determined the qualifications for the presidency: that someone was born here, is over 35 years old, and has lived here for 14 years," Williamson continued. "If they had wanted to say more, than they would have. They didn’t say more for a reason: they were leaving it to every generation to determine for itself the skill set it feels is necessary to navigate the times in which they live."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Williamson has emerged as a household name after a series of eyebrow-raising moments during the first Democratic debate. Her bizarre promise to phone the prime minister of New Zealand as her first act as president went viral.

She also declared during her closing statement that she will meet Trump “on that field” and defeat him with “love.” This has prompted Republicans to donate to Williamson’s campaign in order to keep her in the race.

Fox News reporter Brian Flood contributed to this report.