Nancy Pelosi letting Schiff lead impeachment inquiry after Nadler hearing 'disasters,' Mollie Hemingway says

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is allowing Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., to control the Trump impeachment inquiry because she does not trust another one of her senior colleagues, according to Mollie Hemingway.

Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, has led several closed-door hearings related to the inquiry rather than House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., Hemingway noted Wednesday on "Special Report."

"It's also very interesting that Nancy Pelosi is having Adam Schiff run the impeachment inquiry instead of Jerry Nadler," she said, alluding to the fact the Judiciary Committee has taken a leading role in past impeachment proceedings. Then-Chairman Peter Rodino, D-N.J. took a top role during Nixon proceedings and former Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., did the same during former President Bill Clinton's impeachment process.

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Recently, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., told Fox News his Republican caucus largely utilized Rodino's model when pursuing their case against Clinton.

On "Special Report," Hemingway expanded upon that difference, claiming Pelosi sees Nadler as a weaker chairman than Schiff.

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"[S]he recognizes that Jerry Nadler is very bad at running hearings," she said. "He's had disasters when he's had people -- whether it was Robert Mueller, Corey Lewandowski or John Dean. Those hearings did not go well. It's really a testament to how little she trusts Nadler."

Leading into Hemingway's interview, anchor Bret Baier played a clip of Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla, claiming the impeachment process has been set up differently than in the past.

"The process laid out in the resolution before us is different than the processes used for both President Nixon in 1974 and President Clinton in 1998," he said.

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However, in another clip, Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, offered a different take, claiming when Congress held its first impeachment hearing -- against then-President Andrew Johnson in 1868 -- there was less controversy.

"It really was not this complicated," Green said.