EXCLUSIVE: Fox Nation team and DHS agents evade Mexican police after being threatened while filming

While investigating the human cost of the U.S.-Mexico border crisis, veteran correspondent Lara Logan and DHS agents decided to escape from a Mexican city, where the police force was in league with criminals running the town.

In the final episode of Logan's four-part Fox Nation show "Lara Logan Has No Agenda, she continued her investigation of Tenancingo, a city that the Department of Homeland Security identified as a hub of numerous sex-trafficking rings that lead all the way to New York City.

One of the most infamous trafficking cases involved the Rendon-Reyes family.

"Eight members of the family were indicated in 2015," narrated Logan, as she drove through the streets of Queens, New York, with DHS agent Thomas Countermine.

"For over 10 years, they brought women and girls here to New York, forced them to have sex for money, six days a week, year after year, in cities all over the country. And sent the profits back to Tenancingo," she reported.

Countermine, who was involved in the Rendon-Reyes investigation from the start, showed Logan an ordinary low-rise apartment building where they rescued one of the victims.

"As you can see, when you look at that doorway, all you see is a door," said Countermine. "There's nothing really indicating that anything is going on there."

Countermine and DHS agreed to accompany Logan to Tenancingo, where the Rendon-Reyes family sent their illicit profits.

"We were watched on every street," said Logan later in the episode, as they drove through the streets of Tenancingo, "and down this narrow road where the Rendon-Reyes family members, now serving time in U.S. prisons, once lived."

Logan's crew was accompanied by a private security team and another DHS agent based in Mexico City, who was only identified as Gus to protect his identity.

As detailed in the first episode of "Lara Logan Has No Agenda," soon the police closed in and in no uncertain terms, Logan was told to leave.

The Mexican officers informed told Gus that unwanted visitors in the city were recently lynched, though Logan could not independently verify the claim.

"The police here protect the traffickers?" Logan asked the agents as Mexican police escorted them to the highway.

EXCLUSIVE: LOGAN CORNERED BY MEXICAN POLICE AND THREATENED

"Yeah," replied Gus.

Logan asked to speak to the police, and the crew pulled their vehicles over to the shoulder of the road.

A Mexican police truck stopped in front of them -- diagonally blocking the way forward.

Again, Gus was warned of a mob forming in Tenancingo. "He said 50 to 80 people have already started gathering in the center of town," said Gus after speaking to a Mexican officer, "so he said for our safety he would prefer that we not go back in town."

Then the situation changed dramatically.

"Guys, he's calling the state police to now come and take over," said Gus, getting into the driver's seat of Logan's vehicle.

"But they're still blocking us from leaving or trying to," said Countermine.

"There's a policemen on our left so we can't go around the vehicle," added Logan.

'UNBEARABLE' INTERVIEW OF WOMEN FORCED INTO SEX TRADE: LOGAN

Gus put the vehicle in drive, jumping the car up on the curb and driving around the Mexican police truck, then dodging a van.

Once on the highway, Gus explained the municipal police were going to hold them until the state police arrived.

He later explained that the Mexican state police are notoriously corrupt and may demand bribes from the crew.

Gus wanted to avoid that situation.

"Lara Logan Has No Agenda" is available exclusively on Fox Nation.

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