Veterans

Disabled Texas veteran claims university kicked out his service dog

A military veteran in Texas said he was blindsided when the university he attends told him his service dog was no longer allowed on campus.

Tawan Throngkumpola, who served three tours abroad, told KDAF he received a letter from the University of North Texas on Friday saying he was not allowed to bring his service dog, Cali, to campus anymore.

“This is probably the least disabled veteran-friendly school in the nation right now,” he said.

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Throngkumpola said the problems started in November when the campus banned his 7-year-old Rottweiler, claiming there were five incidents of her being aggressive -- even though the dog never harmed other people.

He said appealed the decision and tried to address it by getting more training classes for Cali. He said the dog was a medical necessity.

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Cali helps ease his PTSD-related anxiety, barks when she senses he is in medical distress, reminds him to take his 20+ pills each day and lies on him at night when she thinks he might be about to sleep walk, Thronkumpola said.

"We made effort to improve, but that's not listed anywhere," explained Throngkumpola. "It's like the University's just made their decision."

A university official wrote in the Friday letter that the school's initial decision would not change.

“I kept reading, ‘We’re upholding these actions.’ But no reason why,” Throngkumpola said.

Fox News reached out to the university for comment.

Throngkumpola told KDAF he would continue to fight to have Cali on campus with him, even if it means taking the university to court.

“I will risk my education, career to make sure this will not happen to another disabled veteran or disabled person,” he said.