Manchester United boss Louis van Gaal says the fearless way he has blooded academy players during his time at the club will attract young talent to Old Trafford in the future.

Van Gaal has been criticized for various reasons at times during his tenure at United but his bold policy of promoting youth has pleased the club's fans and bodes well for the future.

Young forward Marcus Rashford has hit the headlines for his recent goal-scoring exploits but he is just one of 11 academy graduates who have been given a Premier League debut under Van Gaal.

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And the experienced manager thinks the policy will doubly benefit United, because exciting youngsters will feel they are likely to be given their opportunity at the club.

He told the United website: "When you have me as the manager, you have a lot of chances.

"Also, a lot of players, because of that, are coming next season to Manchester United, because they see that.

"I'm doing always what I think I have to do but, you put yourself in my attention, and then I shall give you always a chance."

Van Gaal added that his track record for developing youngsters was one of the reasons United hired him in the first place.

"I had two maiden speeches with them, two conversations, first with Ed [Woodward, executive vice-chairman] and later with the owners," said van Gaal.

"They have said what the culture is of Manchester United and why they want me. One of the reasons was that. I used a lot of players also on the tour in America and on the tour last year."

Van Gaal also explained that reserve and academy players learn by taking on the senior side in practice matches, in which they try to mirror the styles of upcoming opponents.

"[Assistant manager] Ryan Giggs is the trainer-coach of the simulated opponent," said Van Gaal.

"So we simulate the play of West Brom, for example. When youngsters are coming, they learn a lot because of that and they have to perform like West Brom, not like Marcus Rashford or who they are.

"Then I can see if they want to do it or not."