America Together Logo

Vermont records zero new coronavirus cases for first time in nearly 7 weeks

Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.

The coronavirus tally in the Green Mountain State remained the same Wednesday as Vermont health officials said there were zero new COVID-19 cases from the day before.

It was the first day without a newly reported case since March 13.

The Vermont Department of Health website also showed that there were no deaths.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Gov. Phil Scott said it was “great news” but cautioned that “one day doesn’t create a trend, and we have to look at the trend lines to see where we’re going.”

Nurses from Central Vermont Medical Center stand on the Statehouse lawn, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Montpelier, Vt., to counter a protest by a small group against Vermont's stay-at-home order. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

Nurses from Central Vermont Medical Center stand on the Statehouse lawn, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Montpelier, Vt., to counter a protest by a small group against Vermont's stay-at-home order. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

The Green Mountain State has seen a decline in new cases each day for the last several weeks – a trend also seen in the death toll. Tuesday and Sunday saw no deaths and only one on Monday.

As of Wednesday morning, Vermont has seen 862 cases and 47 deaths with 15,429 people tested for COVID-19. The health department website showed that 11 people are currently hospitalized for the virus and 15 are hospitalized under investigation. Eighteen are being monitored.

The state has the third-lowest number of positive cases in the contiguous United States and fifth overall.

Protesters of Vermont's stay-home order gather at the Statehouse, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Montpelier, Vt. Nurses from the local hospital also showed up as a counter-protest. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

Protesters of Vermont's stay-home order gather at the Statehouse, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Montpelier, Vt. Nurses from the local hospital also showed up as a counter-protest. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

VERMONT TEACHER GIVES ART SUPPLIES TO ALL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN COMMUNITY

Vermont’s downward trend has raised questions about whether the state is ready to cautiously reopen – as seen in other states.

Earlier this month, about a dozen people showed up for a protest in the state capital, Montpelier, against the state's stay-at-home order. They were met with four nurses from Central Vermont Medical Center wearing faces masks, who turned out to speak against the demonstration.

Currently, in Vermont, people can shop at outdoor retailers, and five people can work at the same outdoor worksite. Manufacturing and indoor construction also can expand.

In this Monday, April 27, 2020, photo, owners Carol and Mike MacLeod pose in one of the greenhouses of Evergreen Gardens of Vermont in Waterbury Center, Vt. Monday was the first day businesses such as greenhouses and garden centers could allow a small number of customers inside as part of Vermont's gradual coronavirus pandemic reopening plan. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

In this Monday, April 27, 2020, photo, owners Carol and Mike MacLeod pose in one of the greenhouses of Evergreen Gardens of Vermont in Waterbury Center, Vt. Monday was the first day businesses such as greenhouses and garden centers could allow a small number of customers inside as part of Vermont's gradual coronavirus pandemic reopening plan. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

Scott, a Republican, appeared to hint during his news conference Wednesday that loosening restrictions is something that could happen as his state pushes for dramatically increased testing and tracking of the virus.

The goal is to ramp up testing to 1,000 per day – which is more than double what the state has been doing.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

However, Scott cautioned that taking additional steps to reopen the economy – by allowing some people to return to some non-essential offices – could also lead to an increase in cases.

“What we need to do is manage that level,” he said Wednesday, according to VT Digger. “And that’s why we’re doing this tracing, and testing and becoming so heavily involved in taking a more proactive approach because we want to make sure that we control that.”