New York man charged in Capitol siege said he considered it a 'little adventure,' feds say

He allegedly told agents he 'did something that he knew he should not have'

An upstate New York man who admitted to being part of the mob at the U.S. Capitol last week told investigators he took pictures in the building during the siege as part of what he called a "little adventure," court papers show.

Albert Ciarpelli, a 65-year-old Syracuse man, was arrested Wednesday and charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building and engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct on Capitol grounds.

Ciarpelli was captured in news and surveillance photographs inside the Capitol during the Jan. 6 breach, and photos of him were released by the FBI and police, according to the criminal complaint for his arrest

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Albert Ciarpelli, as seen underneath a red arrow indicator (U.S. District Court for District of Columbia)

Albert Ciarpelli, as seen underneath a red arrow indicator (U.S. District Court for District of Columbia) ((U.S. District Court for District of Columbia))

His attorney did not respond to Fox News’ requests for comment.

Ciarpelli told federal agents several days ago he found a partially opened door at the Capitol building and told agents "he then did something that he knew he should not have and made his way into the building," court papers state.

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"[He] took his time making his way through the building taking pictures and looking at the states," court papers state. "He had never been in the building before and he was sight-seeing."

He characterized his more than 15 minutes walking through the building and taking pictures as a "little adventure." He then "got the feeling that he should not be there and decided to leave," court papers further state.

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Ciarpelli told agents "that he was out of his mind and had never done anything like that before," court documents show.

An upstate New York judge released him following his Wednesday afternoon arraignment. He is scheduled to appear in Washington, D.C., court on Jan. 25, Assistant U.S. Attorney Richard Southwick told The Post-Standard of Syracuse.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.