Multiple film production companies say they won’t film in Georgia due to state’s new abortion law

Multiple film production companies announced they won’t film in Georgia after the state’s governor signed the “heartbeat” abortion bill into law Tuesday.

On Tuesday, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed the “heartbeat” bill into law. The bill, HB 481, technically called the "Living Infants Fairness and Equality (LIFE) Act," will prohibit abortions in the state after a heartbeat is detected, as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. The law allows exceptions in cases of rape, incest, or if the life of the mother is in danger.

The law will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020, if not overturned. The bill has been called one of the most restrictive in the nation. Kemp said he recognizes the bill will be challenged.

“The Wire” creator David Simon, who heads Blown Deadline Productions, Christine Vachon of Killer Films and Mark Duplass of Duplass Brothers Productions all vowed that they will not film in Georgia due to the law, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The media outlet pointed out that the boycotts will most likely not have an immediate effect because the companies don’t regularly work in Georgia.

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Killer Films and Duplass Brothers Productions specialize in independent films such as “The Skeleton Twins” and “Boys Don’t Cry.” Simon’s company has produced shows including the hit HBO series “The Wire” and “The Deuce.”

Simon took to Twitter to discuss the controversial law.

“I can’t ask any female member of any film production with which I am involved to so marginalize themselves or compromise their inalienable authority over their own bodies. I must undertake production where the rights of all citizens remain intact. Other filmmakers will see this,” he wrote.

Mark Duplass of Duplass Brothers Productions tweeted, “Don’t give your business to Georgia. Will you pledge with me not to film anything in Georgia until they reverse this backwards legislation?”

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Christine Vachon of Killer Films tweeted, “Killer Films will no longer consider Georgia as a viable shooting location until this ridiculous law is overturned.”

Later, Color Force, which produced the “Hunger Games” films and Counternarrative Forces, announced it would be joining the other production companies in boycotting filming in Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Color Force has filmed in Georgia in the past.

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The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which represents major studios, is taking a wait-and-see approach. A spokesperson for the company said in a statement that MPAA will “continue to monitor developments.”

A number of actors signed a protest letter in March saying they were against the bill. Actress Alyssa Milano told BuzzFeed News that she will return to work on filming the Netflix series “Insatiable” in Georgia but will work to move production to a different state.

“I have to be there for another month but you can be sure I will fight tooth and nail to move 'Insatiable' to a state that will protect our rights,” Milano told BuzzFeed News. “And if it doesn’t move to another state, I will not be able to return to the show if we are blessed with a third season. This is my leverage. I will use it for the betterment of society and our great country.”

Filmmakers J.J. Abrams and Jordan Peele said they will shoot their upcoming HBO series "Lovecraft Country" in Georgia but will donate their profits to groups who have pledged to fight the law.

Fox News’ Caleb Parke and The Associated Press contributed to this report.