Grand juror in Breonna Taylor case files lawsuit to release case transcript so justice may prevail'

Brett Hankison, who was fired in June, faces charges for firing into a nearby apartment

A grand juror in the Breonna Taylor case is requesting the release of records and transcripts of the proceedings so "the truth may prevail" after the panel opted to indict just one of the three police officers involved in the botched drug raid that led to her death.

The suit -- filed Monday by an unnamed juror who seeks to remain anonymous -- also asks that the jurors be allowed to speak freely about the case.

"There is compelling public interest for these proceedings to be released of a magnitude the city and Commonwealth have never seen before that could not be confined, weaving its way across the country," the court documents said. "The citizens of the Commonwealth have demonstrated their lack of faith in the process and proceedings in this matter and the justice system itself."

This undated photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar shows Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky. (Courtesy of Taylor Family attorney Sam Aguiar via AP, File)

This undated photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar shows Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky. (Courtesy of Taylor Family attorney Sam Aguiar via AP, File)

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced last week that a Jefferson County grand jury declined to indict two Louisville police officers in connection with Taylor's death during a botched March 13 drug raid on her Louisville apartment.

Brett Hankison -- the third officer who was fired in June --  faces charges for allegedly firing into a nearby apartment unit. He pleaded not guilty to the charges Monday.

The lack of criminal charges was met with outcry and another wave of protests. The city imposed a 9 p.m. curfew for several days that expired Monday morning.

During his announcement, Cameron said the jury agreed that Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Det. Myles Cosgrove were justified in their actions. Taylor was shot six times when officers opened fire after her boyfriend shot at police first during a no-knock warrant execution. Taylor's boyfriend has said he believed the officers were intruders.

"The attorney general publicly made many statements that referenced what the grand jury heard and decisions that were made based on what certain witnesses said," the court document said. "He further laid those decisions at the feet of the grand jury while failing to answer specific questions regarding the charges presented. Cameron attempted to make it clear that the grand jury alone made the decision on who and what to charge based solely on the evidence presented to them."

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"The interest of the individual grand jurors is parallel to the public but also manifests as fears of persecution, condemnation, retribution, and torment. Unfortunately, they do not get to hide behind an entity, person office," the statement continued.

The filing said Cameron chose his speech wisely.

"Now he has another choice in his response. Choose truth," the document said. "Choose justice. Together Kentucky."

Lawyers for Taylor's family last week demanded Cameron release the grand jury transcripts in an effort to get the full scope of the evidence he presented.