Colorado girl, 6, calls 911 for ‘hurt’ stuffed animal, police respond

Two Colorado police officers were quick to respond to a call from a 6-year-old Fort Collins girl who called 911 to get help for her “hurt” stuffed animal.

The little girl, identified by KDVR as Natalie Coulter, was playing on one of her mother’s old cellphones when she made the emergency call.

“I’ve always given her a dead phone to play with to pretend she’s calling somebody and I never thought anything about it,” her mother, Brittany Coulter, told the news station.

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Two Colorado police officers were quick to respond to a call from a 6-year-old Fort Collins girl who called 911 to get help for her “hurt” stuffed animal.

Two Colorado police officers were quick to respond to a call from a 6-year-old Fort Collins girl who called 911 to get help for her “hurt” stuffed animal. (KDVR)

When the call went through – despite the phone being deactivated for years – Natalie appeared to tell dispatch that her stuffed animal was hurt before hanging up.

Officer Dane Stratton and another cop nearby pin-pointed the home and made a visit.

The police department released audio of the incident Wednesday.

“What’s going on?” Stratton is heard asking after entering the home.

Grandma: “What she was saying what was hurt and needed a doctor –“

Mom: “- was a stuffed bunny.”

Stratton: “Oh no.”

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The police officer asked what was wrong with the bunny, to which Natalie is heard saying: “A scratch!”

“Should we go find a Band-Aid?” he asks.

While they are helping the hurt bunny, Stratton gave the 6-year-old a little lesson about emergency calls.

“Natalie, if bunny’s hurt, we don’t need to call 911,” he says. “But if you’re hurt or mommy’s hurt, absolutely call us, OK?”

He added: “If you do call 911 for mommy being sick or grandma being sick, just make sure you talk to the people on the phone and let them know what’s going on, OK?”

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Stratton told KDVR that he welcomed the opportunity to connect with his community and give a lesson to a young child.

"The last thing that I want is for kids to be scared of us to -- be scared of the services we can provide and to not come to us when they need help," he said.