Millions of Facebook records found on Amazon cloud servers

A massive trove of Facebook users' information was discovered on Amazon's cloud computing servers on Wednesday.

Researchers at UpGuard, a cybersecurity firm, found the private information of millions of Facebook users had been posted publicly, according to Bloomberg News.

One year after the world's largest social network was rocked by the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, which showed that personal information of up to 87 million users was mishandled and wound up being used by a data-mining firm connected to the Trump campaign, the tech giant continues to face questions about whether it's doing enough to protect users' privacy.

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A Mexico City-based company called Cultura Colectiva openly stored 540 million records on Facebook users, which included identification numbers, comments, reactions and account names, Bloomberg reports. That database was closed after the business news site alerted Facebook to the issue.

Bloomberg reports that another database for a long-defunct app called At the Pool listed names, passwords and email addresses for 22,000 people. UpGuard said it did not know how long the information had been exposed.

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Fox News reached out to the Mark Zuckerberg-led company for comment and was provided with this statement:

“Facebook's policies prohibit storing Facebook information in a public database. Once alerted to the issue, we worked with Amazon to take down the databases. We are committed to working with the developers on our platform to protect people's data.”