Sperm whale spotted for first time in inland waters of Washington state

A sperm whale sighting on Saturday has the attention of scientists in Washington state, who say it's the first time the creature has made its way into inland waters.

The Pacific Whale Watch Association said the male sperm whale named "Yukusam" was photographed swimming in Haro Strait in the San Juan Islands.

"They eat giant squid. They're very deep divers and can dive down to over a kilometer. We don't have a lot of waters that is very deep out here," Jeff Friedman, president of Pacific Whale Watch Association, told Q13 FOX.

The male sperm whale named "Yukusam" is animated to be about 45 feet long.

The male sperm whale named "Yukusam" is animated to be about 45 feet long. (Valerie Shore, Eagle Wing Tours & Pacific Whale Watch Association)

The whale, who is estimated to be about 45 feet long, was spotted back in February up in British Columbia northeast of Vancouver Island, which means the whale is headed southward.

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It was the first time a sperm whale has ever been spotted in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, according to the group.

Sperm whales can grow to lengths of 60 feet and "have the largest brain of any creature known to have lived on Earth," according to National Geographic.

The sighting was the first time a sperm whale has been spotted in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands.

The sighting was the first time a sperm whale has been spotted in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands. (Valerie Shore, Eagle Wing Tours & Pacific Whale Watch Association))

"Females and calves remain in tropical or subtropical waters all year long, and apparently practice communal childcare," National Geographic says "Males migrate to higher latitudes, alone or in groups, and head back towards the equator to breed."