Titanic secret contained in Northern Ireland house

A house for sale in Northern Ireland contains a unique link to the doomed ocean liner RMS Titanic.

The four-bedroom home, which was built in 1833 and is located near Belfast, contains wood used to build the ship.

According to the New York Post, the home's owner was told by a man who worked in a local salvage yard that the wood for the kitchen's window seat was used to construct the Titanic -- which sank in the North Atlantic after striking an iceberg on the night of April 14, 1912, killing more than 1,500 passengers and crew members.

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The Titanic leaving Southampton April 10, 1912.

The Titanic leaving Southampton April 10, 1912. (Photo by Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

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The timber reportedly came from Belfast’s Harland & Wolff shipyard, where the Titanic was constructed over three years beginning in 1909.

The house, which is listed for 439,500 pounds ($548,891) and has been carefully restored, was also once a post office.

According to the listing, it has a formal dining room, a living room, an eat-in kitchen, a foyer, an office and a new detached guest house.

In addition, the home features reclaimed pine flooring, an oak staircase, Gothic-style windows and a clawfoot bathtub.

Broker Neil Templeton of Templeton Robinson said the house is a “local hidden gem” and a “once in a lifetime” opportunity for a buyer, according to the Belfast Telegraph.

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