Amazing pictures show lemur trying to steal photographer's camera

Maybe it just wanted to take a selfie.

A curious lemur in Madagascar tried to grab the camera from a photographer who was attempting to take its picture.

Photographer Lucas Bracali said he was "really surprised" when the lemur, a native of the African island nation, swung down from the tree it is was in and tried to grab the camera, British news agency SWNS reports.

This is the hilarious moment a cheeky lemur hung upside down and tried to grab a camera from a photographer who was trying to take its photo. (Credit: SWNS)

This is the hilarious moment a cheeky lemur hung upside down and tried to grab a camera from a photographer who was trying to take its photo. (Credit: SWNS)

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"I was taking a photo of the lemur when all of a sudden he climbed down and tried to grab my camera," Bracali, 54, said in comments obtained by SWNS. "He hung upside down and reached out towards my camera. I couldn't believe it, I was really surprised!"

"I used a super wide-angle and I remained pretty close to the ground with the lens all the way up waiting for the lemur to come down," Bracali added.

Photographer Luca Bracali, 54, was "really surprised" when the black-and-white ruffed lemur attempted to snatch the camera from his grip.  (Credit: SWNS)

Photographer Luca Bracali, 54, was "really surprised" when the black-and-white ruffed lemur attempted to snatch the camera from his grip.  (Credit: SWNS)

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The photo, taken in Andasibe National Park, shows the lemur's hands outstretched toward the camera while hanging upside down from the tree. Bracali, who switched to wildlife photography from sports journalism, said he enjoys the unpredictability of animals.

The funny photo which was taken in Andasibe National Park in Madagascar shows the animal staring directly down the lens while hanging upside down from a tree.  (Credit: SWNS)

The funny photo which was taken in Andasibe National Park in Madagascar shows the animal staring directly down the lens while hanging upside down from a tree.  (Credit: SWNS)

"I enjoy wildlife photography so much because with the animal, it’s a real thorough game," he added. "You cannot bribe them, you can not make any kind of agreement, it’s just a matter of patience and 'carpe diem!'"

According to the Duke Lemur Center in North Carolina, which is home to 14 different species of lemur, the curious creatures are "the most endangered group of mammals in the world."

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