Trump feels Scaramucci comments were 'inappropriate,' White House says

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders conceded Monday that President Trump felt outgoing Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci used "inappropriate" language during his R-rated interview.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the daily press briefing, Monday, July 31, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the daily press briefing, Monday, July 31, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (AP)

After issuing an apology for his now-infamous and expletive-laden interview with The New Yorker, it initially appeared Scaramucci would not suffer any consequences.

But it now appears the salty language left Trump with a bitter taste in his mouth -- and did the same for incoming Chief of Staff Gen. John Kelly.

“The president certainly felt that Anthony's comments were inappropriate... And he didn't want to burden General Kelly,” Sanders said. Her comments came shortly after it was confirmed Scaramucci was being shown the door just 11 days he was announced as the new communications director.

Pressed on exactly what the president found inappropriate, Sanders said the comments were “inappropriate for a person in his position” before moving on to another question.

In this July 25, 2017, photo, White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci walks back to the West Wing of the White House in Washington. Six months into presidency, Donald Trump is saddled with a stalled agenda, a West Wing that resembles a viper’s nest, a cloud of investigations and a Republican Party that is starting to break away.
Against that daunting backdrop, Trump moved July 28 to overhaul his senior team, installing Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly as White House chief of staff. The hard-nosed, retired general replaces Reince Priebus, a Republican operative who was skeptical of Trump’s electoral prospects last year. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

In this July 25, 2017, photo, White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci walks back to the West Wing of the White House in Washington. Six months into presidency, Donald Trump is saddled with a stalled agenda, a West Wing that resembles a viper’s nest, a cloud of investigations and a Republican Party that is starting to break away. Against that daunting backdrop, Trump moved July 28 to overhaul his senior team, installing Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly as White House chief of staff. The hard-nosed, retired general replaces Reince Priebus, a Republican operative who was skeptical of Trump’s electoral prospects last year. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) (AP)

For most of the briefing, Sanders effectively avoided filling in the “tick-tock” of the decision-making process and timeline of Scaramucci’s departure and often repeated that Gen. Kelly “has the full authority” of the president.

Although Trump and Gen. Kelly likely have heard the kind of blunt terms used by Scaramucci in boardrooms and bunkers, it was becoming evident over the weekend that “the Mooch” was creating the kind of inner turmoil Kelly was hired to eliminate.

The New Yorker piece detailed Scaramucci's phone call to a reporter -- in which the communications director attacked then-Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and White House adviser Steve Bannon.