Michael Knowles on Antifa attack on conservative journalist: Media, politicians largely turning a blind eye

A confrontation between far right and left-wing groups in Portland resulted in an attack on conservative journalist Andy Ngo, and political commentator Michael Knowles said Monday that politicians and the media are intentionally ignoring the issue.

Ngo, who writes regularly about Antifa, was at a rally held by the Proud Boys, which faced counter-protesting from Antifa. Video from the incident doesn't show what precipitated the attack or what followed it, but Ngo can be seen being kicked, punched, doused with a milkshake and sprayed with an unknown substance.

The so-called "milkshakes" reportedly contained quick-drying cement, pepper spray and raw eggs.

Three people were later arrested in connection to the attack and other violence during the confrontation in Portland.

Calling Antifa a "domestic terrorist organization" on "Fox & Friends," Knowles denounced the attack on Ngo and questioned why there has not been more widespread condemnation by figures in media and politics. The mayor of Portland and the city's police department have faced criticism for failing to make a public statement about the attack on Ngo.

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"They are turning up these attacks and the politicians are turning a blind eye because we are approaching an election year," Knowles said.

"They will not intimidate any of us. We will not be intimidated into silence," he continued.

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Ngo posted photos from the emergency room after the attack on Sunday where his face appeared bruised, and he claimed to be suffering from a brain hemorrhage.

Some media figures came to Ngo's defense on Twitter, including NBC host Willie Geist and CNN's Jake Tapper, who argued that violence against individuals for their political beliefs should never be condoned.

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Knowles, however, argued that journalists need to stick up for each other, especially as attacks on reporters become increasingly common.

"Major reporters from major outlets in the United States called him a crybaby, called him a snowflake because he was complaining about having a brain hemorrhage, being sent to the hospital with his injuries," Knowles said.

"There is nobody standing up for journalists such as Andy even in the journalism profession itself," he continued.