Ex-DC detective defends controversial 'no-knock' warrants, says officers need 'element of surprise'

Defense attorney and former Washington D.C. police detective Ted Williams told "Bill Hemmer Reports" Wednesday that police searches authorized by so-called "no-knock warrants" should remain in place, despite increased scrutiny of the practice following the March 13 death of Breonna Taylor.

"[No-knocks] are allowed because police officers need -- when serving warrants on some occasions -- an element of surprise," he said. "There is an element of our community that is willing to kill police officers trying to do their jobs ... I'm saddened by what happened in Kentucky."

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Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by Louisville Metropolitan Police officers who had forced their way into her apartment on the evening of March 13. According to a lawsuit filed by Taylor's family, the officers who stormed Taylor's house were executing a drug warrant in search of a male suspect who didn't live in her apartment complex. It turned out he had already been detained by authorities before the warrant was executed.

"As we know, [officers] went in, there was a woman in there with her boyfriend in bed, and at some stage or another, the boyfriend shot at the police officers, the police officers returned fire and unfortunately, the woman was killed," Williams said.

Host Bill Hemmer asked Williams whether some newer tools used by police officers might help alleviate the need for no-knock warrants.

"The police in New York tell me that if you're a felon, they've got an app that can tell them when you leave a Chick-Fil-A," he remarked. "That seems like a different system."

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Williams said the system is indeed different in New York City, but warned that people cannot "simplify" the act of policing past a certain point

"You may think you're going into one kind of situation but wind up in another kind of situation when you are serving warrants," he said, adding that he was "deeply concerned about ... police officers trying to be politically correct in this age that we are in right now [and] that some police officers are going to become -- are going to be seriously injured or killed."