Mike Lindell says MyPillow making masks to fight COVID-19, calls on other manufacturers to help

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MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said Friday that he decided to start making face masks to aid in the fight against the deadly coronavirus (COVID-19) because his passion has always been to help others.

Appearing on "America's Newsroom" with host Ed Henry, Lindell said that he couldn't think of a better time to do so.

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"We started then to find out what we could make," he said. "We worked with the administration. They have a coalition to what kind of masks are need out there. Obviously, we specialize in cotton and we found out different materials that they didn't want -- latex...and stuff. So, finally, we got the final prototype three days ago."

Lindell said it took MyPillow workers three days to turn over a 200,000-square-foot factory into a facility to produce the masks. They are currently making about 10,000 a day and aim to produce up to 50,000 a day.

"And, we're doing the shipping. I'm shipping them out," he continued. "That's what we do at MyPillow. So, a lot of this just fell right in line with what we do. And, I've also switched over other companies. I want every other manufacturer -- see what you can do out there."

In addition, Lindell told Henry that his factories in Connecticut, Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Minnesota are also converting to help the effort.

"It takes one person eight hours a day. We have to do them by hand. You can only make like 100 to 120. So, the bottleneck is just getting people, you know, to do it," he remarked, adding that all workers are six feet apart as well as implementing other safety precautions.

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"So, the goal is [to make] as many as we can make," Lindell stated further. "And, I want to continue into the future -- once this ends -- we want, like the president says, we want our manufacturers here in the USA. Especially, we've learned, our medical supplies.

"We don't want 90 percent coming in from overseas. We want to make them right here and we're going to learn from this," he concluded.