MSNBC, CNN, Washington Post continue to scold Dems for boosting Trump-backed candidates: 'Dangerous game'

CNN's John Avlon called the move by Democrats 'cynical' and 'hypocritical'

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The liberal media has continued to criticize Democrats for boosting Donald Trump-backed Republicans, arguing that the gamble to win elections is a "cynical and "hypocritical" political scheme. 

A number of House Democrats have complained about the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the campaign arm of the party, for attempting to elevate candidates they have repeatedly labeled as a threat to democracy. 

The committee has spent almost half a million dollars to promote Trump-endorsed GOP candidate John Gibbs in Michigan, hoping that voters will view him as extremist in the general election, and vote for his Democratic adversary. 

GOP Maryland gubernatorial candidate Dan Cox handily won the Republican nomination just over a week ago after the Democratic Governors Association spent over a million dollars in advertising to help push Cox to victory. The media, in addition to some Democrats, has raised concerns that these political maneuvers could undermine their message and the work done by the Jan. 6 committee.

HOUSE DEMS BLASTS DCCC INTERFERENCE IN GOP PRIMARIES BOOSTING PRO-TRUMP CANDIDATES

CNN political analyst John Avlon slammed Democrats on Wednesday for their role in boosting Trump-endorsed GOP candidates. 

CNN political analyst John Avlon slammed Democrats on Wednesday for their role in boosting Trump-endorsed GOP candidates.  (CNN)

Much of the scolding this week came from CNN in both on-air segments and in print. 

On Wednesday, CNN’s Jim Sciutto confronted Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Calif., over the party’s strategy, asking him if the move is "fundamentally contradictory." Padilla replied that the bottom line of the decision is in making a "clear contrast" for voters and bolstering their chances in November. 

"I get that — I get that point. But part of the Democratic case here, you hear it from senior Democratic leaders, Nancy Pelosi among them, is that some of these Republican candidates and Trump himself are a threat to democracy. How can Democrats say that but then back some of those election deniers in their own races?" Sciutto pressed. Padilla replied that it would be up to candidates to get Republicans on record on their positions and then let voters decide for themselves.

CNN senior political analyst John Avlon called the strategy both "cynical and hypocritical" on two separate segments, arguing there is a chance the scheme may not work in the party’s favor. 

ANDREW YANG BLASTS DEM STRATEGY OF BOOSTING 'EXTREME' GOP PRIMARY CANDIDATES: 'AMERICANS SHOULD BE ANGRY'

MENDON, IL - JUNE 25: U.S. Representative Mary Miller (R-IL) gives remarks after receiving an endorsement during a Save America Rally with former US President Donald Trump at the Adams County Fairgrounds on June 25, 2022 in Mendon, Illinois. 

MENDON, IL - JUNE 25: U.S. Representative Mary Miller (R-IL) gives remarks after receiving an endorsement during a Save America Rally with former US President Donald Trump at the Adams County Fairgrounds on June 25, 2022 in Mendon, Illinois.  (Photo by Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images)

"It’s a dangerous game to play, because with the gravitational pull of the midterms moving away from the president’s party—there’s a non-zero chance that some of the more extreme candidates could win, despite being objectively worse fits for their district," Avlon said. 

Axios congressional reporter Alayna Treene made a similar observation on MSNBC, calling the strategy "risky" and noting that Democrats were divided on the issue. 

A print article from CNN’s editor-at large, Chris Cilliza, said the political meddling was an example of Democrat’s "blatant hypocrisy" surrounding the 2020 election and their concerns about January 6. 

"…the actions of Democratic campaigns and committees -- meddling in Republican primaries to try to ensure election deniers wind up as the party's nominee so they can run against supposedly weaker candidates -- suggests that all of those pledges about democracy are mere words, not borne out by action," he wrote.

MSNBC columnist Zeeshan Aleem slammed the ploy with Gibbs, writing this week, "No matter the motive, it’s a reckless gamble, and it undermines the credibility of the party’s message that its base must mobilize against burgeoning authoritarianism."

The Washington Post editorial board was similarly condemnatory, urging Democrats to "stop boosting election deniers."

AFTER TRUMP-BACKED CANDIDATE VICTORIES, SOME DEMOCRATS QUESTION PARTY'S MEDDLING IN GOP PRIMARIES

FLORENCE, SC - MARCH 12: Republican House of Representative candidates Katie Arrington, center, and Russell Fry, left, join former US President Donald Trump, right, at the podium during a rally at the Florence Regional Airport on March 12, 2022 in Florence, South Carolina. ]

FLORENCE, SC - MARCH 12: Republican House of Representative candidates Katie Arrington, center, and Russell Fry, left, join former US President Donald Trump, right, at the podium during a rally at the Florence Regional Airport on March 12, 2022 in Florence, South Carolina. ] (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

"The issue is not simply that this scheme could backfire and elect fringe candidates; Democrats’ Machiavellian approach in key races could pan out. Still, it reeks of hypocrisy to elevate figures who deny the election, while also making the case that they are a grievous threat to American democracy," the editorial board wrote.

Vanity Fair also knocked the approach, asserting that Democrats are "gambling with democracy" and lending a hand to GOP candidates who "seek to destroy it."

"But the strategy doesn't only come with obvious risks — suppose of these lunatics win? It also threatens to undermine Democrats' credibility, and the January 6 committee's, as they warn about the grave threat the MAGA GOP poses to democracy," Eric Lutz wrote. 

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Furthermore, a USA Today writer said Democrats’ decision to help Trump-endorsed candidates was a "dangerous political game."

"Where’s the patriotism?" writer Ingrid Jacques asked. 

In total thus far, Democratic organizations have reportedly spent nearly $44 million in campaigns boosting far-right candidates in an effort to persuade Republican voters to select candidates Democrats view as easier to beat in the general election.