Christine Blasey Ford urges Americans to believe Trump's impeachment witness while receiving ACLU courage award

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, accepted the American Civil Liberties Union's Rodger Baldwin Courage Award Sunday and urged Americans to believe President Trump's impeachment witness Marie Yovanovich.

Blasey Ford spoke mostly about her experience with sexual assault before invoking Yovanovich's name and asking Americans to stand with the former ambassador to Ukraine. Yovanovich testified about her dismissal from the post during a congressional hearing on Friday.

"It's not just survivors that we have to stand up for. It's all of those who come forward to support our country," Blasey Ford said.

"Ambassador Yovanovitch — all of the men and women who bravely come forward, they come forward, to tell the truth, and to help our country. They might also be vilified and they need to hear our voices of support also."

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Blasey Ford also cited Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' accuser Anita Hill as a source of inspiration and said she was ill-prepared for the backlash that awaited her, following the fallout from the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings.

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"When I came forward last September, I did not feel courageous. I was simply doing my duty as a citizen," she said earlier in the speech. "Providing information to the Senate that I believed would be relevant to the Supreme Court nomination process... I had the example of Anita Hill. I had the values instilled in me by my parents and growing up in Washington D.C. I had a responsibility to my country, to my fellow citizens, to my students, to my children — to live the values that I tried to teach them.

"I understood that not everyone would welcome my information," Blasey Ford continued.

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"And I was prepared for a variety of outcomes, including being dismissed. I was not prepared for the venom, the persistent attacks, the vilification, the loss of personal privacy, and the collateral damage to my friends and my family... I have learned a lot over the past year. I have learned that there is a well-financed attack machine out there ready to flood the Internet and the media, anytime I raise my head. And I know it's not going to go away."