Bloomberg warns of 'devastating' Republican supermajority if Sanders is Dem nominee

Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg argued that if Democrats chose Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., as their presidential nominee, the government would soon be dominated by Republicans and the resulting judicial confirmations would be "devastating" for decades.

"I believe that if Bernie Sanders gets the nomination, he will lose to Donald Trump, he will make sure that the Senate stays in Republican hands, he will flip the House back to the Republicans, and even down-ballot he's going to hurt the Democrats," Bloomberg told MSNBC in an interview aired on Friday.

"So you will have a lot of gerrymandering down-ballot in states, which will hurt the country for a long time. But worse, at the federal level, you will have a whole bunch of judges -- probably even two Supreme Court justices -- that the Republicans will appoint. And those judicial decisions that come out of that will be devastating for this country for decades."

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Bloomberg maintained, however, that he would help Sanders in a general election if the senator did become the nominee.

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"In this case, the alternative to the Democratic candidates -- even Bernie Sanders -- is so bad, I've said that I will vote for the Democratic candidate, even if it's Bernie Sanders," he said.

He added that he would provide money and resources for Sanders in a general election. Bloomberg wasn't sure how much he would have to spend, but said that he would keep his campaign offices open through Nov. 3.

Bloomberg vowed, during that same interview, not to give up easily against Sanders.

“I am going to stay right to the bitter end, as long as I have a chance,” Bloomberg said.

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Bloomberg added that he wouldn't give up at the Democratic National Convention even if Sanders garnered a plurality of pledged delegates.

"If Bernie Sanders were to get a majority, then of course not," Bloomberg clarified.