Axelrod claims Biden 'serially distorting' record, 'in danger of creating more damaging' trend with gaffes

David Axelrod, a former top adviser in President Obama's administration, weighed in again on former Vice President Joe Biden's presidential run, warning that the Democratic front-runner risked a new level of embarrassment if he continued misleading people about his record on the Iraq War.

"It's one thing to have a well-earned rep for goofy, harmless gaffes. It's another if you serially distort your own record. @JoeBiden is in danger of creating a more damaging meme," he tweeted on Thursday.

The criticism was Axelrod's latest aimed at the man he served under at the beginning of Obama's presidency.

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Axelrod linked to an article on Biden which appeared to dispute the former vice president's claim former President George W. Bush fooled him as a senator into supporting military action in Iraq.

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During an interview with NPR, Biden claimed that Bush told him he wanted an authorization for military force as a way to "get inspectors into Iraq" so the U.S. could uncover any potential nuclear programs. Bush's spokesman reportedly denied that happened, calling the former senator's recollection "flat wrong."

Biden has faced scrutiny over a long list of apparent gaffes lately. At the end of August, The Washington Post claimed that Biden "jumbled elements of at least three actual events into one story." He also reportedly got a number of facts wrong.

"In the space of three minutes, Biden got the time period, the location, the heroic act, the type of medal, the military branch and the rank of the recipient wrong, as well as his own role in the ceremony," the Post reported.

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His campaign dismissed the verbal slip-ups as part of a press narrative but they appeared to have raised enough concerns that allies of the former vice president reportedly suggested he scale back the number of events he did on the campaign trail.

Axelrod previously blasted that advice, arguing on Thursday that he shouldn't be cloistered as a presidential candidate.