Dr. Alveda King: My uncle, Martin Luther King Jr., would ask us to talk to each other without hate or rancor

While tributes all over the country will celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy, Dr. Alveda King, the niece of the civil rights leader, reflected on her uncle's “God-inspired” life and legacy.

“I really believe he would ask us to communicate without fear, without hate, without rancor. I believe we can still do that in America. I really do,” the author of the book “The Spirit of a Dream,” told “Fox & Friends,” pointing out how her uncle would address the division in the country.

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King, who would have turned 91 on Jan. 15, is regarded for championing equal rights for African Americans through organized boycotts and rallies as well as by encouraging non-violent protests such as the one in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963. Perhaps most famously, King led the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his poignant "I Have a Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

King was assassinated by James Earl Ray on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tenn.

Alveda told a “famous story” about her father, A.D King, driving on the road with Dr. King during their joint preaching expedition across the country. She recalled that when an oncoming car did not abide by the traffic law, keeping their "bright lights" on and flashing the King brothers' vehicle, her father was not pleased.

“My dad says ‘brother, the next car, we’re going to turn our lights on, too.’” And then Martin Luther King Jr. reportedly said, ‘No, we’re not going to do that because they’re doing wrong; We’re going to do what’s right.’”

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King went on to say, “From a teenager, all the way to his death many years later in 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. just had that kind of heart. He was always seeking to do what was right. Was he perfect? No. Did he make mistakes? Of course, he was a human being. But he was a prophet of God, so he was always trying to do what was right.

“And that’s the Martin Luther King Jr. I’ll always remember,” King said.

Fox News’ Vandana Rambaran contributed to this report.