Dog-shaped ice cream treats from Taiwan are freaking out the Internet

For anyone looking to get a taste of the viral dessert that’s been delighting (and horrifying) Instagram users in recent days, just know you’ll need to book a ticket to Taiwan.

The J. C. Co Art Kitchen, in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, is responsible for those adorable, almost too lifelike ice cream “puppies” that bear striking resemblances to pugs, Labradors and Shar Peis respectively, The Straits Times reports.

Thanks to viral posts on social media – such as the off-putting one embedded above – representatives for the restaurant have claimed they’re having trouble keeping up with demand for the treats, according to Reuters.

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The desserts come in three flavors, including earl-grey (Labradors), chocolate (pugs) and peanut (Shar Peis). Each costs between $110 and $188 Taiwanese dollars, or between around $3.50 and $6.

The J. C. Co Art Kitchen, however, can only make about 100 per day, as each frozen treat is made by using special molds that impart each “puppy” with a hairy texture. They are then removed from the molds and given a few finishing touches by an employee before being served.

One customer was quoted by Reuters as saying he/she had mixed emotions about the dog-shaped treat, and even feels “sorry for him.”

"It is as if a dog is lying here and I feel like cutting into him will hurt him,” the patron said.

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The concerned customer isn’t alone, either, as footage of the ice cream has left social media torn.

“OH  MY GOD WHY DID YOU MAKE ME WATCH THAT,” one user wrote in response to footage of a spoon scooping off the dessert’s “head.”

"I SCREAMED," wrote another.

Meanwhile, a Twitter user on the other side of the argument admitted, "I can’t lie it looks too good."

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Despite the responses on social media, serving up lifelike doggie desserts is apparently lucrative enough to inspire copycats: A café on the other side of Taiwan, in Yilan, is now serving up similar frozen doggie desserts, Asia One reports.