Michigan beachgoers form human chains to rescue swimmers, as 2 drown in rough waves

Michigan beachgoers formed human chains into Lake Michigan on Sunday to help rescue swimmers caught in rough waves that were blamed for two deaths and three-near drownings.

The Grand Haven Department of Public Safety said in a news release the multiple water rescues took place at Grand Haven State Park Beach starting at 12 p.m., leading to a full beach closure.

The first incident came in at 12:05 p.m., when a swimmer was reported struggling in the water and bystanders formed a human chain to help search for the man. Officials told FOX17 that David Knaffle, 64, of Wyoming was located around 12:14 p.m., but was found unresponsive and later died.

Nearly four hours later, the department said a 20-year-old man from Lansing was pulled from the water. He also died.

In this Aug. 5, 2018 photo, beachgoers help the Grand Haven Department of Public Safety officers form human chains to search for missing people in Lake Michigan at Grand Haven State Park in Grand Haven, Mich. Authorities said people formed human chains to rescue swimmers caught in rough water blamed for multiple drownings over the weekend. (Becky Vargo/The Tribune via AP)

In this Aug. 5, 2018 photo, beachgoers help the Grand Haven Department of Public Safety officers form human chains to search for missing people in Lake Michigan at Grand Haven State Park in Grand Haven, Mich.  (Becky Vargo/The Tribune via AP)

"Officers formed several human chains with assistance from bystanders in search of a swimmer that was reported to have gone under the water," Director of Public Safety Jeff Hawke said. "Officers located the man in approximately 5 feet of water and then performed CPR."

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Hawke said that three other people were hospitalized after being rescued from the rough waves, including a 46-year-old man listed in serious condition.

A moderate beach hazard remains at the state park on Monday, with waves expected to be between 1-4 feet along Lake Michigan, according to FOX17.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed