Judge issues order barring 'house of horrors' parents from contact with 13 kids

A judge on Wednesday issued a protective order against “house of horror” parents David and Louise Turpin, barring them from contacting any of their 13 children.

The order prohibits the Turpins from contacting their kids, except through attorneys or investigators, and will remain in effect until Jan. 24, 2021, KABC-TV reported.

turpin split ap

David and Louise Turpin, pictured here in court Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018, have pleaded not guilty to torture and other charges.  (Terry Pierson /The Press-Enterprise via AP, Pool)

The Turpin parents reportedly cannot bar their children from testifying in court, “must not harass, strike, threaten, molest, destroy belongings," or stalk the victims and can have no personal contact with them.

The victims, which range in age from 2 to 29, were rescued on Jan. 14 from their home in Perris, California.

"Victims in these kinds of cases, they tell their story, but they tell it slowly. They tell it at their own pace," Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin told The Associated Press Wednesday. "It will come out when it comes out."

The Turpin children remain hospitalized and are relieved to be out of the Perris home, which authorities have described as a torture chamber, Hestrin said.

'HOUSE OF HORRORS' COUPLE EXPECTED IN COURT; REPORTEDLY PLANNED MOVE TO OKLAHOMA BEFORE ARREST

Investigators have learned since the Turpins’ arrest 10 days ago that the children were shackled to beds, isolated from each other, didn’t have access to TV or radios and, according to Hestrin, “lacked any kind of understanding about how the world worked.”

One of the couple’s older sons, however, was enrolled in a variety of classes at San Jancinto’s community college, and Louise Turpin transported him to and from class, and waited outside the classroom for him.

Louise, 49, and David, 57, have both pleaded not guilty to torture, child abuse, false imprisonment, dependent adult abuse and a lewd act on a child under age 14. If convicted on all charges, they each face sentences of 94 years to life in prison.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.