MILITARY

Advocates vow to continue work in Minnesota Somali community

  • In this Dec. 20, 2016 photo, several people use self-help computers at an employment center in the heart of Minneapolis' largest Somali neighborhood. The center, which connects job seekers to employers, was created with grant money as part of a federal pilot project designed to combat terror recruitment by creating positive opportunities for youth. (AP Photo/Amy Forliti)

    In this Dec. 20, 2016 photo, several people use self-help computers at an employment center in the heart of Minneapolis' largest Somali neighborhood. The center, which connects job seekers to employers, was created with grant money as part of a federal pilot project designed to combat terror recruitment by creating positive opportunities for youth. (AP Photo/Amy Forliti)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Dec. 20, 2016 photo, Mohamud Noor, executive director of the Confederation of Somali Community in Minnesota, poses for a photo at an employment center in Minneapolis' largest Somali neighborhood. Noor's organization created the center with grant money as part of a federal pilot project designed to combat terror recruitment by creating positive opportunities for youth. (AP Photo/Amy Forliti)

    In this Dec. 20, 2016 photo, Mohamud Noor, executive director of the Confederation of Somali Community in Minnesota, poses for a photo at an employment center in Minneapolis' largest Somali neighborhood. Noor's organization created the center with grant money as part of a federal pilot project designed to combat terror recruitment by creating positive opportunities for youth. (AP Photo/Amy Forliti)  (The Associated Press)

Those at the forefront of efforts to counter terror recruiting by providing positive opportunities for Somali youth in Minnesota say they'll continue the work they started, despite future unknowns.

Last year, six groups received funding as part of a federal pilot project to combat terror recruitment. Boston and Los Angeles are also participating in the project.

Minnesota's program focuses on the state's large Somali community, which has been a target for terrorism recruiters. One of the Minnesota efforts, an employment center, has helped roughly 1,000 people find jobs.

John Cohen, former Department of Homeland Security counterterrorism coordinator, says he's concerned about the future of these programs under President-elect Donald Trump, who has pledged to temporarily ban Muslim immigrants and surveille mosques.

Messages left with Trump's transition team weren't immediately returned.