Massachusetts

Archaeologists think they found Pilgrims' original settlement

In 1620, the Mayflower set out from Plymouth, England with some 100 passengers that included people fleeing religious persecution, as well as others seeking prosperity and the chance to build a new life. After more than two months of travel, they ended up near Cape Cod, Massachusetts, eventually settling in another part of the state where they set up a village. Within a year, about half had died.

In 1620, the Mayflower set out from Plymouth, England with some 100 passengers that included people fleeing religious persecution, as well as others seeking prosperity and the chance to build a new life. After more than two months of travel, they ended up near Cape Cod, Massachusetts, eventually settling in another part of the state where they set up a village. Within a year, about half had died.  (AP)

Archaeologists have pinpointed what they think is the exact spot where the Pilgrims lived in the years after landing in the New World.

Every American schoolchild knows the Pilgrims landed in Plymouth in 1620, but exactly where has been elusive.

Archeologists from the University of Massachusetts Boston tell The Boston Globe they have discovered what is believed to be part of the original settlement, based on the discovery of a calf's bones, musket balls, ceramics and brownish soil where a wooden post once stood.

UMass-Boston professor David Landon says the discoveries are compelling evidence that a sliver of the original settlement existed at what is known as Burial Hill.

The curator of collections at the Plimoth Plantation says the discovery will "absolutely change what we understand about that settlement."